The Russian Revolution

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jul 13, 2011 - History - 976 pages
1 Review
Mr. Pipes writes trenchantly, and at times superbly....No single volume known to me even begins to cater so adequately to those who want to discover what really happened to Russia....Nor do I know any other book better designed to help Soviet citizens to struggle out of the darkness."

-- Ronald Hingley, The New York Times Book Review

Ground-breaking in its inclusiveness, enthralling in its narrative of a movement whose purpose, in the words of Leon Trotsky, was "to overthrow the world," The Russian Revolution draws conclusions that have already aroused great controversy in this country-and that are certain to be explosive when the book is published in the Soviet Union. Richard Pipes argues convincingly that the Russian Revolution was an intellectual, rather than a class, uprising; that it was steeped in terror from its very outset; and that it was not a revolution at all but a coup d'etat -- "the capture of governmental power by a small minority."


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Methinks he protests too much about how bad the Bolsheviks were. Of course now we know how truly murderous, but comparing them to the Nazis may be going a bit far, with such comments: "Lenin hated ... Read full review

The Russian Revolution

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The author, a distinguished Harvard historian, seeks to present a comprehensive view of the Russian Revolution, tracing its roots in the half century before 1917, a period he has already examined in ... Read full review

Contents

PART on E The Agony of the Old Regime
25
Official Russia
53
Patrimonialism 53 Nicholas and Alexandra 57
86
Household village and commune 92 land shortage
109
peasant attitudes to law and property H4 changes
119
The Constitutional Experiment
153
Monarchy and constitutionalism 153 the Fundamen
191
Strategic preparations and Russias readiness for
211
The October Coup
439
Building the OneParty State
506
BrestLitovsk
567
The Revolution Internationalized
606
War Communism
671
War on the Village
714
The Red Terror
789
Lenins attitude toward terror 789 abolition of
796

Russian debacle in Poland 1915 216 changes in gov
228
Inflation 234 the Brusilov offensive 238 rise often
246
of November 1916 252 assassination of Rasputin
258
Imperial family 269
269
PART Two The Bolsheviks Conquer Russia
339
Russias breakdown 336
341
The Bolshevik Bid for Power
415
the Commissariat of Justice 803 Lenin shot August
816
revolted by bloodbath 825 Cheka penetrates all
839
Chronology
847
Notes
856
One Hundred Works on the Russian Revolution
915
Index
922
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Richard Pipes was for many years a professor of history at Harvard University. He is the author of numerous books and essays on Russia, past and present, including Russia Under the Bolshevik Regime. In 1981–82 he served as President Reagan's National Security Council adviser on Soviet and East European affairs, and he has twice received a Guggenheim fellowship. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Marlborough, New Hampshire.

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