An Introductory History of England ...: From the earliest times to the close of the middle ages. 1907

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E. P. Dutton, 1907 - Great Britain
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Page 276 - Fair laughs the Morn, and soft the zephyr blows, While proudly riding o'er the azure realm In gallant trim the gilded vessel goes: Youth on the prow, and Pleasure at the helm: Regardless of the sweeping whirlwind's sway, That hush'd in grim repose expects his evening prey.
Page xx - Westward the course of empire takes its way, The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day : Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Page 14 - The mountain sheep are sweeter, But the valley sheep are fatter ; We therefore deemed it meeter To carry off the latter.
Page 284 - The blood of English shall manure the ground And future ages groan for this foul act; Peace shall go sleep with Turks and infidels, And in this seat of peace tumultuous wars Shall kin with kin and kind with kind confound; Disorder, horror, fear and mutiny Shall here inhabit, and this land be call'd The field of Golgotha and dead men's skulls.
Page 284 - Not all the water in the rough rude sea Can wash the balm from an anointed king; The breath of worldly men cannot depose The deputy elected by the Lord.
Page 112 - Thou shalt tread upon the lion and the adder, the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under feet.
Page 292 - Christ's lore, and his apostles twelve He taught, but first he followed it himself.
Page iii - is the boy who, having so grown up with the story of his country, can people the fields and lanes of his home with the figures of the past, can hear the clatter of Rupert's horsemen down his village street, and can picture the good monks catching baskets of trout where he is failing to get a rise.
Page 276 - Mighty victor, mighty lord ! Low on his funeral couch he lies ! No pitying heart, no eye, afford A tear to grace his obsequies.
Page 249 - ... the granges full of corn, the houses full of all riches, rich burgesses, carts and chariots, horse, swine, muttons and other beasts: they took what them list and brought into the king's host; but the soldiers made no count to the king nor to none of his officers of the gold and silver that they did get; they kept that to themselves.

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