Lovis Corinth

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University of California Press, 1990 - Art - 347 pages
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This splendid and generously illustrated monograph by Horst Uhr is the first comprehensive study of one of the great individualists in the history of art. Lovis Corinth (1858-1925) has long been recognized as a major figure in German painting, along with Emile Nolde and Max Beckmann. Spanning a tremendously fertile period in European painting, his astonishingly productive career touched on major currents of art in his time, from the nineteenth-century academic tradition to Naturalism, Impressionism, and Expressionism. Corinth was accomplished in several media, including painting, drawing, and watercolor. After his death in 1925 virtually every major German city held its own memorial exhibition.

Professor Uhr draws on the artist's own diaries and letters, observations by his family, and writings by contemporaries to construct a detailed narrative which places Corinth's deeply autobiographical and personal work in the context of turn-of-the-century art politics in Munich and Berlin. Corinth is seen in relation both to contemporary cultural figures, such as artists, critics, and dealers, and to the theater, the Jugendstil movement, the Berlin Secession, and the Nietzsche cult in Germany. Corinth's themes in combination with powerful use of color and bold application of paint distinguish him as a modern master.
 

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About the author (1990)

Horst Uhr is Professor of Art History at Wayne State University in Detroit. His previous publications include Masterpieces of German Expressionism at the Detroit Institute of Arts, German Drawings and Watercolors: The Collections of the Detroit Institute of Arts, and numerous articles on the works of Lovis Corinth.

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