The Herb of the Field

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Macmillan, 1887 - Botany - 311 pages
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Page 73 - The glory of Lebanon shall come unto thee, the fir tree, the pine tree, and the box together, to beautify the place of my sanctuary; and I will make the place of my feet glorious.
Page 253 - The voice said, Cry. And he said, What shall I cry? All flesh is grass, And all the goodliness thereof is as the flower of the field : The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: . Because the spirit of the Lord bloweth upon it: Surely the people is grass. The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: But the word of our God shall stand for ever.
Page 250 - A Syrian ready to perish was my father, and he went down into Egypt, and sojourned there with a few, and became there a nation, great, mighty, and populous...
Page 67 - Hie away, hie away, Over bank and over brae, Where the copsewood is the greenest, Where the fountains glisten sheenest, Where the lady-fern grows strongest, Where the morning dew lies longest, Where the black-cock sweetest sips it, Where the fairy latest trips it. Hie to haunts right seldom seen, Lovely, lonesome, cool, and green, Over bank and over brae, Hie away, hie away. 'Do the verses he sings...
Page 28 - Two from our birthday ever beards have worn, On other two none ever have appeared, While the fifth brother wears but half a beard.
Page 249 - We have ploughed, we have sowed, We have reaped, we have mowed We have brought home every load, Hip, hip, hip, Harvest home ! and thus, sir, the whole assembly shout
Page 215 - Indeed it has hardly been known in this country for more than a hundred years, and is still considered as one of the rarest of fruits.
Page 197 - A mushroom their table, and on it was laid A water-dock leaf, which a table-cloth made ; The viands were various, to each of their taste, And the Bee brought his honey to crown the repast. There, close on his haunches, so solemn and wise...
Page 113 - Peak of Teneriffe, which I should guess to be one of the most beautiful places in the world. The best oranges for eating that we get come from St. Michael's, a little island of the Azores, but there are many others imported from Spain and Portugal. The red-juiced blood oranges grow in Malta, and the delicious, fragrant little Mandarin orange is chiefly grown at Tangier. To all these places they were first brought in the fourteenth or fifteenth centuries from China, their original birthplace.

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