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Books Books 1 - 10 of 13 on Never, whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will the savant, who is conscientious....
" Never, whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will the savant, who is conscientious and careful of his reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather. "
Rovings in the Pacific, from 1837 to 1849: With a Glance at California - Page 264
by Edward Lucett - 1851
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The Nautical Magazine: A Journal of Papers on Subjects Connected ..., Volume 15

Naval art and science - 1846
...present, I feel entitled to deduce from the sum of my investigations, this capital conclusion : — Never, whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will the savant, who ii conscious and careful of his reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather." THE EXPERIMENTAL...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 10

1846
...I feel entitled to deduce from the sum of my investigations this capital consequence: — Never — whatever may be the progress of the sciences — will the savant, who is conscientious and careful of ha reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather." WE find the following curious details in...
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Journal of the Franklin Institute, Volumes 41-42

Franklin Institute (Philadelphia, Pa.) - Meteorology - 1846
...capital conclusion : — Never, whatever may he the progress of the sciences, will the savant, ivho is conscientious and careful of his reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather." Naut. Mas. Manufacture of Water Colors and Black Lead Pencils. Any improvement or advancement in the...
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Introduction to Meteorology

David Purdie Thomson - Meteorology - 1849 - 487 pages
...to determine a year, or even a month, or a week in advance, is impossible. " Never," says Arago, " whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will...reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather." Once more • 1 Sec Arnott,— Elem. of Physics. * Georg. i. 355, et seq ; Varro. to quote the eloquent...
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The Dynamical Theory of the Formation of the Earth, Volume 2

Archibald Tucker Ritchie - Cosmogony - 1850
...with his guarantee attached to them, we adopt as additional evidence : — " Never," says Arago, " whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will...reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather." And, once more, to quote the eloquent words of Sir David Brewster — " In the very atmosphere in which...
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The Dynamical Theory of the Formation of the Earth, Volume 2

Archibald Tucker Ritchie - Cosmogony - 1850
...evidence :— " Never," says Arago, " whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will the mivant who is conscientious and careful of his reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather." And, once more, to quote the eloquent words of Sir David Brewster— " In the very atmosphere in which...
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The American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year

Almanacs, American - 1861
...sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh or whither it goeth.' " " Never," exclaims Arago, t "whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will...reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather" "Quackery," observes Bory de St. Vincent, " has too long abused the public credulity upon this subject...
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The American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge

Almanacs, American - 1861
...canst not tell whence it cometh or whither it goeth.' " " Never," exclaims Arago, t " whatever may he the progress of the sciences, will the savant, who...reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather" "Quackery," ohserves Bory de St. Vincent, " has too long ahused the puhlic credulity upon this suhject...
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The American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the ..., Volume 32

Almanacs, American - 1861
...thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh or whither it gocth.' " " Never," exclaims Arago, t " whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will the savant, who is conscientious and carefnl of his reputation, speculate on a prediction of the weather" "Quackery," observes Bory de St....
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The Living Age ..., Volume 92

1867
...at beet, two days distant. Beyond this limit, as the philosophic Arago has justly observed, " Never, whatever may be the progress of the sciences, will the savant who ч conscientious and careful of his reputation »peculate on a prediction of the weathroUBTH SERIE»....
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