Visualizing Nutrition: Everyday Choices

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Dec 19, 2017 - Health & Fitness - 528 pages

Visualizing Nutrition teaches students to identify and connect the central elements of nutritional science using a visual approach. As students explore important nutrition topics, they are immersed in content that not only provides scientific understanding, but demonstrates relevance to their personal lives. Students are challenged and taught the decision-making skills needed to navigate the countless choices they will face in promoting their good health and preventing disease. Visualizing Nutrition's critical thinking approach with a solid underpinning of the scientific process empowers students to be knowledgeable consumers when faced with decisions about what to eat.

 

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Contents

APPENDIX A Dietary Reference Intakes
1
10
10
Sugars Starches and APPENDIX C U S Nutrition Guidelines and Recommendations
82
Vitamins
170
Water and Minerals
219
Energy Balance and Weight
265
Nutrition Fitness and Physical
304
6
310
Nutrition During Pregnancy
339
Nutrition from 1 to 100
371
How Safe Is Our Food Supply?
405
1
441
APPENDIX A Dietary Reference Intakes
463
APPENDIX B Healthy Eating Patterns
473
REFERENCES
485
INDEX
503

Nutrition Fitness and Physical Recommendations
334

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About the author (2017)

Mary Grosvenor holds a B.A. in English and a M.S. in Nutrition Science, affording her an ideal background for nutrition writing. She is a registered dietitian and has worked in clinical and research nutrition in hospitals in communities large and small in the western United States. She has had an extensive career teaching at community colleges and has published research articles on nutritional assessment as well as nutrition and cancer. Her training and experience provide practical insights into the application and presentation of the science found in this title.

Lori Smolin holds a B.S. in Nutritional Science from Cornell where she studied human nutrition and food science. She received a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, focusing on B vitamins, homocysteine accumulation and metabolism. She completed post-doctoral training at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center where she studied human obesity, and the University of California–San Diego where she studied genetic defects in amino acid metabolism. Dr. Smolin is currently at the University of Connecticut where she has taught both in the Department of Nutrition Science and the department of Molecular and Cell Biology.

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