The Evolution of Long Island: A Story of Land and Sea, Volume 9

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Yale University Press, 1921 - Geology - 194 pages
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Page 69 - That splendor of fine bows which yet could stand The shock of rollers never checked by land; That art of masts, sail-crowded, fit to break, Yet stayed to strength and backstayed into rake; The life demanded by that art, the keen Eye-puckered, hard-case seamen, silent, lean. They are grander things than all the art of towns; Their tests are tempests and the sea that drowns. They are my country's line, her great...
Page 11 - Great Men are the inspired (speaking and acting) Texts of that divine BOOK OF REVELATIONS, whereof a Chapter is completed from epoch to epoch, and by some named HISTORY...
Page 69 - That art of masts, sail crowded, fit to break, Yet stayed to strength and backstayed into rake, The life demanded by that art, the keen Eye-puckered, hard-case seamen, silent, lean, — They are grander things than all the art of towns, Their tests are tempests and the sea that drowns...
Page 121 - Indeed, there was no motive for putting booty underground when it could be readily disposed of in the open market. Bellomont complained in one of his letters of this same eventful summer: ''There are about thirty Pyrates come lately into the East end of Nassau Island and have a great deal of Money with them, but so cherished are they by the Inhabitants that not a man among them is taken up.
Page 65 - Whereas the trying of oyle so near the street and houses, is soe extreme noysome to all passers by, especially to those not accustomed to the sent thereof, and is considered hurtful to the health of people, and is very dangerous (if oyle should fire) for firing houses...
Page 29 - ... winter, so as to be set up in the spring on the new made land which is intended to be sown, in order that the cattle may not in any wise injure the crops. In most lands is found a certain root, called red Wortel, which must before ploughing, be extirpated with a hoe, expressly made for that purpose.
Page 30 - ... principally parsnips, carrots, and cabbage — which bring great plenty into the husbandman's dwelling. The maize can serve as bread for men and food for cattle. The hogs, after having picked up their food for some months in the woods, are crammed with corn in the fall. When fat they are killed and furnish a very hard and clean pork — a good article for the husbandman, who gradually and in time begins to purchase horses and cows with the produce of his grain and the increase of his hogs, and,...
Page 29 - All then who arrive in New Netherland must immediately set about preparing the soil so as to be able, if possible to plant some winter grain, and to proceed the next winter to cut and clear the timber. The trees are usually felled from the stump, cut up and burnt in the field...
Page 119 - ... contention was the fact that, though New York had increased greatly in size and importance since 1687, the revenue from Customs had actually declined. He draws a striking picture how a Custom House officer appointed by him came and begged he might resign, " telling me that though most of that town were his near relations and several of them of his name, yet he was threatened by them to be knocked on the head, and he had already suffered many abuses, insomuch that he was in fear of his life.

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