The Trade of the World: Our Present System of Commerce Examined

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D. Bogue, 1880 - Commerce - 444 pages
 

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Page 42 - This great increase of the quantity of work, which in consequence of the division of labor the same number of people are capable of performing, is owing to three different circumstances : first, to the increase of dexterity in every particular workman; secondly, to the saving of the time which is commonly lost in passing from one species of work to another; and lastly, to the invention of a great number of machines which facilitate and abridge labor and enable one man to do the work of many.
Page 439 - States than are or shall be payable on the like articles being the growth, produce, or manufacture of any other foreign country...
Page 438 - ... or immunity whatever, in matters of commerce and navigation, which either contracting party has actually granted, or may hereafter grant, to the subjects or citizens of any other State, shall be extended to the subjects or citizens of the other...
Page 342 - Resident entered the hall of audience," says the old German physician, " they cried out ' Holanda captain/ which was the signal for him to draw near and make his obeisances. Accordingly, he crawled on his hands and knees to a place shown him, between the presents ranged in due order on one side, and the place where the Emperor sat on the other ; and there kneeling, he bowed his forehead quite down to the ground, and so crawled backwards, like a crab, without uttering a single word. So mean and short...
Page 438 - Plata shall have the like liberty of commerce and navigation stipulated for in the preceding article, to the full extent in which the same is permitted at present, or shall be permitted hereafter, to any other nation.
Page 48 - The case in which it may sometimes be a matter of deliberation, how far, or in what manner it is proper to restore the free importation of foreign goods, after it has been for some time interrupted, is, when particular manufactures, by means of high duties or prohibitions upon all foreign goods which can come into competition with them, have been so far extended as to employ...
Page 51 - According to the doctrine now stated, the only direct advantage of foreign commerce consists in the imports. A country obtains things which it either could not have produced at all, or which it must have produced at a greater expense of capital and labour than the cost of the things which it exports to pay for them.
Page 342 - Then he order'd us to take off our cappa, or cloak, being our garment of ceremony, then to stand upright, that he might have a full view of us; again to walk, to stand still, to compliment each other, to dance, to jump, to play the drunkard, to speak broken Japanese, to read Dutch, to paint, to sing, to put our cloaks on and off.
Page 60 - ... although as a matter of mere diplomacy it may sometimes answer to hold out the removal of particular prohibitions or high duties, as depending upon corresponding concessions by other States in our favour, it does not follow that we should maintain our restrictions in cases where the desired concessions on their part cannot be obtained ; our restrictions would not be the less prejudicial to our own capital and industry because other Governments persisted in preserving impolitic regulations...
Page 225 - In a world apart, secluded from all extraneous influences, nestling at the feet of her majestic mother, Canada dreams her dream, and forebodes her destiny — a dream of ever-broadening harvests, multiplying towns and villages, and expanding pastures ; of constitutional self-government and a confederated Empire ; of page after page of honourable history, added as her contribution to the annals of the Mother Country and to the glories of the British race ; of a perpetuation for all time upon this...

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