Narrative of a pedestrian journey through Russia and Siberian Tartary, from the frontiers of China to the Frozen sea and Kamtchatka

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1824
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Page 328 - Tchuktchi, their manners and customs, pronounce them of American origin, of which the shaving of their heads, puncturing of their bodies, wearing large ear-rings, their independent and swaggering way of walking, their dress, and superstitious ideas, are also evident proofs...
Page 5 - I determined to undertake a journey, varying only the object and the scene to that of the unfortunate Ledyard, viz. — to travel round the globe, as nearly as can be done by land, crossing from northern Asia to America at Behring's Straights. I also determined to perform the journey on foot, for the best of all possible reasons, that my finances allowed of no other.
Page 17 - Rub the feet at going to bed with spirits mixed with tallow dropped from a candle into the palm of the hand ; on the following morning no blister will exist. The spirits seem to possess the healing power, the tallow serving only to keep the skin soft and pliant. This is Captain Cochrane's advice, and the remedy was used by him in his pedestrian tour...
Page 78 - My way lay over a country where the Tver is a wandering stream, and where numerous handsome seats and neat villages made their appearance. These, however, but too strongly reminded me of the effects of absenteeship in Ireland, being evidently in a rapid state of decay. I have no hesitation, however, in saying, that the condition of the peasantry here is far superior to that class in Ireland. In Russia provisions are plentiful, good, and cheap ; while in Ireland they are scanty, poor, and dear, the...
Page 151 - ... vestige of apparel, except the handkerchief on the head. The young girls had the hair plaited and hanging down like the Biscay girls, or brought up under the left arm, and fastened to the fore part of the shift by a riband. Such is the simple summer dress : the winter, or gala one, is, however, more tawdry. Their features appear delicate, but their limbs are strong, and their complexion very dark. " At Kamenski I quitted the great Siberian road, not far from Tara, passing several neat Tartar...
Page 266 - Spite of our prejudices, there is nothing to be compared to the melting of raw fish in the mouth; oysters, clotted cream, or the finest jelly in the world is nothing to it ; nor is it only a small quantity that may be eaten of this precious commodity. I myself have finished a whole fish, which, in its frozen state, might have weighed two or three pounds, and, with black biscuit, and a glass of rye-brandy, have defied either nature or art to prepare a better meal.
Page 123 - On reaching the Asiatic side of the Ural chain, I could not help remarking that the inhabitants of all the villages were much more civil, more hospitable, and more cleanly dressed; and in no one instance would they accept of money for the food I had occasion to procure. I never entered a cottage, but shtshee (a cabbage soup), with meat, milk and bread, were...
Page 256 - ... purpose he had a thick porridge of rice boiled down with three pounds of butter, weighing together twentyeight pounds, and although the glutton had already breakfasted, yet did he sit down to it with great eagerness, and consumed the whole without stirring from the spot...
Page 239 - ... I was provided also with a couple of bags of black biscuit through the kindness of my host, with a piece of roast beef, a few dried fish, half-a-dozen pounds of tea, and twenty pounds of sugar-candy, besides fifty pounds of tobacco, and a keg of vodkey (corn-brandy), a most indispensable article on such a journey, whether for my own or others
Page 319 - The fail' at length finished, I prepared to depart for Nishney Kolymsk, with many thanks to my venerable Yukagir host for all his kindness. I passed the time very agreeably at his house ; he was a very good chess-player, and was fond of the game. His manner of play added another instance to many I have witnessed, that there is, in various parts of the world, little or no difference any where in the moving of the pieces. I have played the game with Yakuti, Tongousi, and Yukagiri ; but the Tchuktchi...

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