Ku Klux Kulture: America and the Klan in the 1920s

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University of Chicago Press, Nov 22, 2017 - History - 272 pages
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In popular understanding, the Ku Klux Klan is a hateful white supremacist organization. In Ku Klux Kulture, Felix Harcourt argues that in the 1920s the self-proclaimed Invisible Empire had an even wider significance as a cultural movement.

Ku Klux Kulture reveals the extent to which the KKK participated in and penetrated popular American culture, reaching far beyond its paying membership to become part of modern American society. The Klan owned radio stations, newspapers, and sports teams, and its members created popular films, pulp novels, music, and more. Harcourt shows how the Klan’s racist and nativist ideology became subsumed in sunnier popular portrayals of heroic vigilantism. In the process he challenges prevailing depictions of the 1920s, which may be best understood not as the Jazz Age or the Age of Prohibition, but as the Age of the Klan. Ku Klux Kulture gives us an unsettling glimpse into the past, arguing that the Klan did not die so much as melt into America’s prevailing culture.
 

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Contents

1 Ordinary Human Interests
1
2 White and White and Read All Over
12
3 Fiery CrossWords
31
4 The Good the Bad and the Best Sellers
52
5 Good Fiction Qualities
75
6 Just Entertainment
100
7 That Ghastly Saxophone
123
8 PBS The Protestant Broadcasting System
142
9 Invisible Umpires
160
The Most Picturesque Element
179
Acknowledgments
185
Notes
187
Glossary
225
Bibliography
227
Index
249
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About the author (2017)

Felix Harcourt is visiting assistant professor of history at Austin College. He is assistant editor of The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers: The Human Rights Years.

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