Latinos, Inc.: The Marketing and Making of a People

Front Cover
University of California Press, Sep 1, 2012 - History - 330 pages
Both Hollywood and corporate America are taking note of the marketing power of the growing Latino population in the United States. And as salsa takes over both the dance floor and the condiment shelf, the influence of Latin culture is gaining momentum in American society as a whole. Yet the increasing visibility of Latinos in mainstream culture has not been accompanied by a similar level of economic parity or political enfranchisement. In this important, original, and entertaining book, Arlene Dávila provides a critical examination of the Hispanic marketing industry and of its role in the making and marketing of U.S. Latinos.

Dávila finds that Latinos' increased popularity in the marketplace is simultaneously accompanied by their growing exotification and invisibility. She scrutinizes the complex interests that are involved in the public representation of Latinos as a generic and culturally distinct people and questions the homogeneity of the different Latino subnationalities that supposedly comprise the same people and group of consumers. In a fascinating discussion of how populations have become reconfigured as market segments, she shows that the market and marketing discourse become important terrains where Latinos debate their social identities and public standing.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Dont Panic Im Hispanic The Trends and Economy of Cultural Flows
23
Knowledges Facts and Fictions of a People as a Market
56
Images Producing Culture for the Market
88
Screening the Image
126
Language and Culture in the Media Battle Zone
153
The Focus or Fuck Us Group Consumers Talk Back or Do They?
181
The Business of Culture
216
Notes
241
References
259
Index
283
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Arlene Dávila is Assistant Professor of American Studies and Anthropology at New York University.She is the author of Sponsored Identities: Cultural Politics in Puerto Rico(1997).

Bibliographic information