The Lost Art of Real Cooking: Rediscovering the Pleasures of Traditional Food One Recipe at a Time

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Penguin, Jul 6, 2010 - Cooking - 256 pages

 

It's time to take back the kitchen. It's time to unlock the pantry and break free from the shackles of ready-made, industrial food. It's time to cook supper.

The Lost Art of Real Cooking heralds a new old-fashioned approach to food-laborious and inconvenient, yet extraordinarily rewarding and worth bragging about. From jam, yogurt, and fresh pasta to salami, smoked meat, and strudel, Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger arm you with the knowledge and skills that let you connect on a deeper level with what goes into your body.

Ken and Rosanna celebrate the patience it takes to make your own sauerkraut and pickles. They divulge the mysteries of capturing wild sourdoughs and culturing butter, the beauty of rendering lard, making cheese, and brewing beer, all without the fancy toys that take away from the adventure of truly experiencing your food.

These foods were once made by the family, in the home, rather than a factory. And they can still be made in the smallest kitchens without expensive equipment, capturing flavors that speak of place and personality. What you won't find here is a collection of rigid rules for the perfect meal. Ken and Rosanna offer a wealth of recipes, history, and techniques that start with the basics and evolve into dishes that are entirely your own.

 

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The Lost Art of Real Cooking

User Review  - lwittman - Overstock.com

This book is a lot of fun to read. The authors have a very specific point of view which is that time and energy invested into making food is worth it. You dont need a lot of gadgets just good ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SignoraEdie - LibraryThing

A very basic book about traditional ways of preparing various foods. Does not contain detailed recipes, but does give you the sense that you can easily prepare the items using your common sense and a few tips. Very basic but well put together. Read full review

Contents

A NOTE ON RECIPE FORMAT
A NOTE ON KITCHENS
Pickles
Sauerkraut
Red Cabbage
Pickle Variations on a Theme
Lupins
Koji Pickles
Smoked but Uncured
Cured Meats
Codfish
Tuna
Fish Stock
Basic Fish Soup
Chicken Stock
Roast Fowl with Gravy

Fresh Tomato Sauce
Easy Tomato Sauce
Onion Soup
White Gazpacho
Broccoli Rabe or Rapini
Yapraki or Dolmas Stuffed Grape Leaves
Salads and Their Dressings
Preserves
Jam
Marmalade
Preserved Lemons
Basic Pasta Dough
Tagliatelle with Tomato Sauce
Buckwheat Noodles
Squash Ravioli
Oatmeal Porridge
Corn Tortillas
Rice
Risotto
Pizza Dough
Pizza Margherita
American Pizza
Pita Bread
Sprouted Grain Bread
Sourdough Bread
Wild Yeast Bread
Wholemeal Bread
Sourdough Herb Muffins
The Gentle Art of Roasting
Roast Piggie
Meatballs
Pork Pie
Rabbit
Olla Podrida
Smoking
Seasoned Smoked and Steamed
Stuffed Conceited Chicken
Chicken Rollatini
Duck or Goose Confit
Chicken Goose or Duck Pâté
Cultured Butter
Crème Fraîche
Yogurt
Cheese
Wine
Psychic Love Wine
Beer
Cooking with Beer
Beer Stews and Other Pleasant Diversions
Pastry for Pies
Pie Fillings
Strudel
Sourdough Crepes
Shortcakes
Doughnuts
Bourbon Truffles
Dutch Baby
A
C
D
E
G
H
J
M
N
Q
S
T
U
Y
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Ken Albala is professor of history at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, where he teaches courses on the Renaissance and Reformation, Food History, and the History of Medicine. He is the author of many books on food, includ­ing Eating Right in the Renaissance, Food in Early Modern Europe, Cooking in Europe 1250–1650, The Banquet: Dining in the Great Courts of Late Renaissance Europe, Beans: A History (winner of the 2008 International Association of Culinary Professionals Jane Grigson Award), Pancake, and the forthcoming World Cuisines written with the Culinary Institute of America. He is also the editor of three food series for Greenwood Press with 27 vol­umes in print and is now editing a four-volume Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia. Albala has been the book reviews edi­tor of Food Culture and Society for the past six years and is now co-editor of the journal. He is currently researching a history of theological controversies surrounding fasting in the Reforma­tion Era and editing two collected volumes of essays, one on the Renaissance, the other on food and faith.
Rosanna Nafziger grew up on a mountain in West Virginia. She spent her girlhood working in the orchard, plant­ing beans, and selling pies at the farmers' market. Now she trans­lates the traditions of her Appa­lachian Mennonite upbringing to the urban kitchen on her blog, Paprikahead.com. A chef, nanny, and editor, she lives in San Francisco. This is her first book.

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