Book Chat, Volume 8

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William George Jordan, Adr Schade van Westrum
Brentano Bros., 1893 - American literature
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Page 4 - Red of the Dawn ! Is it turning a fainter red? so be it, but when shall we lay The Ghost of the Brute that is walking and haunting us yet, and be free? In a hundred, a thousand winters? Ah, what will our children be, The men of a hundred thousand, a million summers away?
Page 4 - Hudibras, than him ; because the cavalcade was mostly burlesque : but he was an extraordinary man, and buried after an extraordinary fashion ; for I do believe there was never such another burial seen. The oration, indeed, was great and ingenious, worthy the subject, and like the author; whose prescriptions can restore the living, and his pen embalm the dead. — And so much for Mr. Dryden ; whose burial...
Page 2 - Whereon their oldest and their boldest said, ' He, whom thou wouldst not heal ! ' and all at once The morning light of happy marriage broke Thro' all the clouded years of widowhood, And muffling up her comely head, and crying ' Husband ! ' she leapt upon the funeral pile, And mixt herself with him and past in fire.
Page 3 - Once again thou flamest heavenward, once again we see thee rise. Every morning is thy birthday gladdening human hearts and eyes. Every morning here we greet it, bowing lowly down before thee, Thee the Godlike, thee the changeless in thine ever-changing skies.
Page 4 - ... sorrow into Thee we pass By that same path our true forefathers trod ; And let not Reason fail me, nor the sod Draw from my death Thy living flower and grass, Before I learn that Love, which is, and was My Father, and my Brother, and my God ! Steel me with patience ! soften me with grief ! Let blow the trumpet strongly while I pray, Till this embattled wall of unbelief My prison, not my fortress, fall away ! Then, if thou wiliest, let my day be brief, So Thou wilt strike Thy glory thro
Page 202 - SMITH. With Portraits on Steel of the Author and Others. 8vo, 650 pages. Cloth, $2.00. These selections, sixty-five in number, embrace a wide range of topics of absorbing public interest, and include twenty-five speeches devoted to the tariff question in all its aspects, and others on silver, Federal elections, pensions, and the public debt, civilservice reform, the Treasury surplus and the purchase of bonds, the direct tax bill, etc. The orator whose views are thus presented is the best authority...
Page 4 - I come now from Mr. Dryden's funeral, where we had an Ode in Horace sung, instead of David's Psalms ; whence you may find, that we don't think a poet worth Christian burial. The pomp of the ceremony was a kind of rhapsody, and fitter, I think, for Hudibras, than him; because the cavalcade was mostly burlesque...
Page 4 - THO' Sin too oft, when smitten by Thy rod, Rail at ' Blind Fate ' with many a vain ' Alas ! ' From sin thro' sorrow into Thee we pass By that same path our true forefathers trod ; And let not Reason fail me, nor the sod Draw from my death Thy living flower and grass, Before I learn that Love, which is, and was My Father, and my Brother, and my God...
Page 100 - A SHORT HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH PEOPLE. By JOHN RICHARD GREEN, MA, LL.D. With Coloured Maps, Genealogical Tables, and Chronological Annals. Crown 8vo.
Page 202 - The author here describes the adventures and romantic episodes attendant upon the early Spanish explorations of our Southwest. The scene of the story which gives its title to the volume is laid in Venezuela, and the legend of El Dorado is for the first time told accurately in popular form. With this exception the tales relate to our own country. They include the stories of the mysterious " Seven Cities of Cibola," " El Quivira," and others of equal dramatic interest and historical value.

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