Free Markets and Social Justice

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Mar 18, 1999 - Political Science - 416 pages
0 Reviews
The newest work from one of the most preeminent voices writing in the legal/political arena today, this important book presents a new conception of the relationship between free markets and social justice. The work begins with foundations--the appropriate role of existing "preferences," the importance of social norms, the question whether human goods are commensurable, and issues of distributional equity. Continuing with rights, the work shows that markets have only a partial but instrumental role in the protection of rights. The book concludes with a discussion on regulation, developing approaches that would promote both economic and democratic goals, especially in the context of risks to life and health. Free Markets and Social Justice develops seven basic themes during its discussion: the myth of laissez-faire; preference formation and social norms; the contextual character of choice; the importance of fair distribution; the diversity of human goods; how law can shape preferences; and the puzzles of human rationality. As the latest word from an internationally-renowned writer, this work will raise a number of important questions about economic analysis of law in its conventional form.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
3
I Foundational Issues
11
II Rights
149
III Regulation
243
Afterword
384
Index
387
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Cass R. Sunstein is the Karl N. Llewellyn Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Chicago School of Law. His own previous works include Democracy and the Limits of Free Speech (1994), The Partial Constitution (1993), After the Rights Revolution (1990), and Legal Reasoning and Political Conflict (Oxford, 1996).

Bibliographic information