Journal of an embassy from the governor-general of India to the courts of Siam and Cochin China: exhibiting a view of the actual state of those kingdoms, Volume 2

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H. Colburn and R. Bentley, 1830 - Cochin China
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Page 453 - William Frederick, Earl of Clarendon, Baron Hyde of Hindon, a Peer of the United Kingdom, a Member of Her Britannic Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath...
Page 128 - Than-Wetsuwan, when he enters the infernal hall of justice, and thereafter may I fall into the lowest pit of hell ; or if these miseries should not ensue, may I after death migrate into the body of a slave, and suffer all the hardships and...
Page 401 - I told him it could be of no use to a private person, though a proper place for a company to settle a colony on, lying in the centre of trade, and being accommodated with good rivers and safe harbours, so conveniently situated that all winds served shipping both to go out and come into these rivers.
Page 128 - I be afflicted by the intolerable oppressions of my superiors ; or may a plague cause my death ; after which, may I be precipitated into hell, there to go through innumerable stages of torture, amongst -which, may I be condemned to carry water over the flaming regions, in open...
Page 68 - Every male in the kingdom,' says Mr. Crawfurd, ' must at one period or another of his life enter the priesthood, for however short a time. Even the king will be a priest for two or three days, going about for alms like the rest, and the highest officers of the government continue in the priesthood for some months.
Page 128 - ... divinities who adore Buddha, or from the gods of the four elements, and all other spirits ! ' May blood flow out of every pore of my body, that my crime may be made manifest to the world ! — may all or any of these evils overtake me within three days, or may I never stir from the spot on which I now stand, or may the hatsani, or lash of the sky...
Page 284 - China, which it imitates in everything, to be patriarchal or paternal ; and the object held out is to rule the kingdom as a private family — the chief instrument, however, being the rod. Nothing seems to bound the authority of the king but the fear of insurrection, and such immemorial and indefinite usages as exist in all countries, however bad their governVOL.
Page 349 - ... little variety in the seasons. The greatest quantity of rain falls in December and January, but refreshing showers are experienced throughout the year. In 1820 rain fell on 229 days; in 1821, on 203; in 1824, on 136; and in 1825, on 171; giving an average, in four years, of about 185 rainy, and 108 dry days. The rainy months are the coldest, namely December and January ; and the dryest months, April and May, the hottest. The lowest range of the thermometer within the year 1825 was 71 and the...
Page 402 - Person, tho" a proper Place for a Company to settle a Colony on, lying in the Center of Trade and being accommodated with good Rivers and safe Harbours, so conveniently situated, that all Winds served Shipping both to go out and come into those...
Page 300 - The only part," says our author, " of the religious belief of the Cochin-Chinese and Tonquinese, which assumes a systematic form, or appears to reach the heart, or materially to affect the character or conduct of the people, is the worship of the manes of progenitors. This universally obtains; it is enforced by the government not only as a religious but as a moral and civil duty; and the honours paid to the dead, appear to be considered equally necessary to their comfort and repose, as to the temporal...

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