Happy-go-lucky

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Houghton Mifflin, 1885 - 412 pages
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Page 384 - On lips that are for others; deep as love, Deep as first love, and wild with all regret; O Death in Life, the days that are no more.
Page 351 - What I do And what I dream include thee, as the wine Must taste of its own grapes. And when I sue God for myself, He hears that name of thine, And sees within my eyes the tears of two.
Page 275 - An' they heard but the openin' of one prison lock, An' Shamus O'Brien kem into the dock. For one minute he turned his eye round on the throng. An' he looked at the bars, so firm and so strong, An' he saw that he had not a hope nor a friend, A chance to escape, nor a word to defend ; An...
Page 74 - This is the curse of life ! that not A nobler, calmer train Of wiser thoughts and feelings blot Our passions from our brain; But each day brings its petty dust Our soon-choked souls to fill, And we forget because we must And not because we will.
Page 360 - If Hope prostrate lie, Love, too, will sink and die. But Love is subtle, and doth proof derive From her own life that Hope is yet alive ; And bending o'er, with soul-transfusing eyes, And the soft murmurs of the mother dove, Woos back the fleeting spirit, and half supplies ; Thus Love repays to Hope what Hope first gave to Love.
Page 47 - For the divil himself couldn't blaze with his eye, So droll an' so wicked, so dark and so bright, Like a fire-flash that crosses the depth of the night! An...
Page 277 - And if a stranger sojourn with thee in your land, ye shall not vex him. But the stranger that dwelleth with you shall be unto you as one born among you, and thou shalt love him as thyself; for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt: I am the LORD your God.
Page 314 - Once the hungry Hours were hounds Which chased the day like a bleeding deer. And it limped and stumbled with many wounds Through the nightly dells of the desert year. But now, oh weave the mystic measure Of music, and dance, and shapes of light, Let the Hours, and the spirits of might and pleasure, Like the clouds and sunbeams, unite.

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