Wives and daughters, Volume 2

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Smith Elder, & Company, 1866 - 564 pages
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Review: Wives and Daughters

User Review  - Goodreads

When I die, of all the things I'll be asking those who have gone before, Gaskell will be the foremost to get the real ending. Read full review

Review: Wives and Daughters

User Review  - Goodreads

I adored this book. If only Mrs Gaskell had survived to finish the book. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
10
III
19
IV
33
V
40
VI
49
VII
64
VIII
71
XVII
167
XVIII
177
XIX
189
XX
199
XXI
209
XXII
222
XXIII
231
XXIV
243

IX
85
X
96
XI
108
XII
117
XIII
129
XIV
138
XV
148
XVI
158
XXV
254
XXVI
265
XXVII
275
XXVIII
284
XXIX
294
XXX
305
XXXI
315
XXXII
328

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Page 84 - Then spake the woman whose the living child was unto the king, (for her bowels yearned upon her son) and she said, O my lord, give her the living child, and in no wise slay it : but the other said, Let it be neither mine nor thine, but divide it.
Page 46 - I can admire, and I can like, but I never feel carried off my feet by love for any one, not even for you, little Molly, and I am sure I love you more than — ' " ' No, don't !' said Molly, putting her hand before Cynthia's mouth, in almost a passion of impatience.
Page 162 - He would say it to me, in his pretty way, whenever I was a little low — for I am a complete barometer — you may really judge of the state of the weather by my spirits, I have always been such a sensitive creature! It is well for Cynthia that she does not inherit it; I don't think her easily affected in any way, do you ? ' Molly thought for a minute or two, and then replied — 'No, she certainly is not easily affected — not deeply affected, perhaps I should say.
Page 18 - I've copied out all the fine words they said of you: "careful observer," "strong nervous English," "rising philosopher." Oh! I can nearly say it all off by heart, for many a time when I am frabbed by bad debts, or Osborne's bills, or moidered with accounts, I turn the ledger wrong way up, and smoke a pipe over it, while I read those pieces out of the review which speak about you, lad!
Page 34 - He saw more of it by day, by night, in storm and sunshine, or in the still, soft cloudy weather. He never spoke about what he felt on the subject ; indeed, he did not put his feelings into words, even to himself. But, if his mood ever approached to the sentimental, it was on such days as this. He rode into the stable-yard, gave his horse to a man, and went into the house by a side entrance. In the passage he met the Squire. " That's capital, Gibson ! What good wind blew you here? You'll have some...
Page 109 - I'm afraid he'll expect me to be always as good as he fancies me now, and I shall have to walk on tiptoe all the rest of my life." " But you are good, Cynthia,
Page 13 - She's in a mental fever of some kind," thought he to himself. " She's very fascinating, but I don't quite understand her." If Molly had not been so entirely loyal to her friend, she might have thought this constant brilliancy a little tiresome, when brought into everyday life ; it was not the sunshiny rest of a placid lake — it was rather the glitter of the pieces of a broken mirror, which confuses and bewilders. Cynthia would not talk quietly about anything now ; subjects of thought or conversation...
Page 183 - Preston were keeping company just as if she was a maid-servant and he was a gardener : meeting at all sorts of improper times and places, and fainting away in his arms, and out at night together, and writing to each other, and slipping their letters into each other's hands ; and that was what I was talking about, sister, for I next door to saw that done once. I saw her with my own eyes run across the street to Grinstead's, where he was, for we had just left him there ; with a letter in her hand,...
Page 225 - ... Roger's love became for the instant a treasure; but, again, she knew that in its entirety of high undoubting esteem, as well as of passionate regard, it would no longer be hers; and for the flaw which she herself had made, she cast it away, and would none of it. Yet often in after years, when it was too late, she wondered, and strove to penetrate the inscrutable mystery of 'what would have been.' 'Still take till to-morrow before you act upon your decision,' said Mr. Gibson, slowly. 'What faults...
Page 153 - Cynthia's reiterated promises of marriage," replied he. " She says she would rather leave Hollingford for ever, and go out to earn her bread, than marry you." His face fell a little. He looked so bitterly mortified that Molly was almost sorry for him. " Does she say that to you in cold blood ? Do you know you are telling me very hard truths, Miss Gibson ? — if they are truths, that is to say," he continued, recovering himself a little.

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