An account of the Gold Coast of Africa: with a brief history of the African Company, Volume 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1812 - Ashanti (African people) - 264 pages
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Page 227 - A wilderness of sweets : for nature here Wanton'd as in her prime, and play'd at will Her virgin fancies, pouring forth more sweet, Wild above rule or art, enormous bliss.
Page 9 - No dew falls during the continuance of the harmattan; nor is there the least appearance of moisture in the atmosphere. Vegetables of every kind are very much injured ; all tender plants, and most of the productions of the garden, are destroyed ; the grass withers, and becomes dry like hay...
Page 248 - Netherlands, with the exclusive privilege to traffic and plant colonies on the coast of Africa from the Tropic of Cancer to the Cape of Good Hope ; on the coast of America, from the straits of Magellan to the remotest north.
Page 48 - That it does not depend entirely on the warmth of that covering is clear ; for the same degree of warmth produced by wearing more clothing of a different kind does not produce the same effect. The perspiration of the human body being...
Page 263 - The compensation was paid, and the Royal African company ceased to exist from April 10, 1752. To its successor Parliament allowed from 10,000 to 15,000 a year, wherewith to keep up the African forts for the public service ; and for the next 55 years, down to the abolition...
Page 9 - It comes on indiscriminately at any hour of the day, at any time of the tide, or at any period of the moon, continuing sometimes only a day or two, at other times five or six days, and it has been known to last upwards of a fortnight.
Page 183 - ... strings a bead, which is equal to one ackie of gold ; and sixteen ackies make an ounce, the value of which is usually estimated at four pounds. They have no fixed standard of weights and measures. As to the means of increasing their trade, they obviously consist in opening a free intercourse with the interior; in introducing an improved system of agriculture, and the arts of civilized life ; in enlarging their knowledge and exciting their industry ; and, above all, in establishing such a government...
Page 178 - ... south-west winds, which meet with nothing on the shore to mitigate their severity; and partly because the air is there impregnated with saline particles thrown up by a constant and generally violent surf. About two or three miles from the Sea, the soil is found to be much more productive; and It gradually improves as it recedes, till, at the distance of six or eight miles...
Page 186 - Vetiste, and to obtain from him the knowledge which is requisite for the exercise of their profession, which is, to solve the doubts and perplexities of their followers, and to furnish them .with the means of averting evil, either actual or possible. Their profits arise from the presents made to the Fetish by the votaries : these they appropriate to their own use ; and they are often of considerable value. The Fetishmen usually connect themselves with the persons in power, and are often serviceable...
Page 263 - Account of proceedings of commissioners appointed by " an Act for the application of a sum of money therein mentioned, granted to His Majesty for making compensation and satisfaction to the Royal African Company of England for their charter, lands, forts, castles, slaves, military stores and all other their effects whatsoever, and to vest the lands, forts, castles, slaves, and military stores, and all other their effects, in the company of merchants trading to Africa and for other purposes in the...

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