Recollections of Baron Gros's Embassy to China and Japan in 1857-58

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R. Griffin & Company, 1861 - China - 368 pages
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Page 368 - ... still withheld from Japanese subjects, but an immense stride was taken towards a more liberal policy, and the echoes of Niphon may soon ring once more with the sounds of the church-going bell. The Japanese government had learned to dread foreigners less in coming closely in contact with them, and they had obtained ample proof that it was neither the lust of conquest nor commercial gain which had brought the representatives of France to those seas, but the necessity of protecting the political...
Page 332 - ... He settled, indeed, with his companions in the green Kiousiou, and from him and them descend the noble race of men who for centuries have peopled the Japanese archipelago. Unfortunately, facts ill accord with this pretty legend. The Japanese, with skins as white as our own, cannot be the descendants of the yellow sons of Han ; and indeed they repudiate all idea of common descent with the Chinese. Their civilization, which in many respects is identical with that of the Chinese, is in others totally...
Page 233 - KT-INO. 233 appearance of an impending row. The English thought they could detect, in these demonstrations of the mob, a return to the old policy of China which had been largely turned to account at Canton.
Page 145 - In this period of three years barbarian matters have been affected by many conditions of change, and in proportion as these have been various in character, has it become necessary to shift ground, and to adopt alterations...
Page 334 - ... inferred to have sprung at an early period from the great Mongol family, and to have emigrated by Corea. The Chinese consider Japan as a country tributary to the Middle Empire. Nevertheless at Nangasaki they are not allowed to go beyond the walls of their factory, which is surrounded by a high paling. At Yedo we were obliged to put a stop to our Chinese servants...
Page 300 - having been abandoned, and the bad season approaching rapidly, Baron Gros decided, in the beginning of September, to leave Shang-hai and set sail for Japan, in order to accomplish the second part of his mission. He had at his disposal only two vessels of the Imperial navy, the sloop of war the ' Laplace,' the advice-boat the ' Pregent,' and a small trading steamer, hired for the same purpose, named the
Page 306 - ... turnips. The governor told us, with evident satisfaction, that these flowers were the work of his officers ; which certainly gave us a high idea of the neat handiness of these gentlemen, although it somewhat lowered our opinion of the importance and serious character of their occupations. That the principal functionaries of the state are free to spend their time in making artificial flowers out of carrots and turnips and lobster-flesh, proves that the social machine is well THE BAZAAR. 307 ordered,...
Page 338 - ... existence of the people during the summer months, and deprived us of one souvenir de voyage. When the Japanese wish to designate the I, that is to say their own personality, they touch their nose ; the tip of this organ being, according to them, the seat of individuality. There is nothing wonderful in all this. When a Frenchman wishes to be very impressive, and to indicate his ego, does he not press his hand upon the stomach ? The monetary unit in Japan is the itchibou, a pretty little coin shaped...
Page 366 - ... escheated. Much of this land has now become more valuable than it was when taken from them, having been improved by agriculture, and some of it now being occupied by flourishing towns. The last sentence of the article in the French treaty is this, " Whatever has been heretofore written, proclaimed, or published in China, by order of the Government, against the Christian faith, is wholly abrogated and nullified in all the provinces of the empire.
Page 199 - ... crews were saved by the energy of the commander of the ' Victorieuse ' and the intrepidity of Lieutenant Poidloue and Lieutenant Lapelin, who made a voyage of five hundred miles in a long-boat to get assistance from Shang-hai. We have very imperfect information about the geography of these waters ; the soundings and reefs are not known, and the charts are defective. At all events, a very limited confidence can be placed in them. After a fourdays...

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