Make No Law: The Sullivan Case and the First Amendment

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Apr 20, 2011 - Law - 368 pages
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The First Amendment puts it this way: "Congress shall make no law...abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press." Yet, in 1960, a city official in Montgomery, Alabama, sued The New York Times for libel -- and was awarded $500,000 by a local jury -- because the paper had published an ad critical of Montgomery's brutal response to civil rights protests. The centuries of legal precedent behind the Sullivan case and the U.S. Supreme Court's historic reversal of the original verdict are expertly chronicled in this gripping and wonderfully readable book by the Pulitzer Prize -- winning legal journalist Anthony Lewis. It is our best account yet of a case that redefined what newspapers -- and ordinary citizens -- can print or say.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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Wonderful and very readable book about the Freedom of Press in USA from Bill of Rights to Supreme Court judgement in Sullivan Case vs NY Times Read full review

Contents

Reaction in Montgomery
9
Separate and Unequal
15
The Trial
23
Silencing the Press
34
The Meaning of Freedom
46
The Sedition
55
World War I
67
Holmes and Brandeis Dissenting
80
What It Meant
153
Inside the Court
164
Public and Private
183
The Dancing Has Stopped
200
Back to the Drawing Board?
219
Envoi
234
First Draft of justice Brennans Opinion
249
Opinions in New York Times Co v
253

The Vitalizing Liberties
90
To the Supreme Court
103
There Never ls a Time
127
The Central Meaning of the First Amendment
140
NOTES 319
306
INDEX
343
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