The Disappearance of Childhood

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jun 8, 2011 - Social Science - 192 pages
53 Reviews
From the vogue for nubile models to the explosion in the juvenile crime rate, this modern classic of social history and media traces the precipitous decline of childhood in America today−and the corresponding threat to the notion of adulthood.

Deftly marshaling a vast array of historical and demographic research, Neil Postman, author of Technopoly, suggests that childhood is a relatively recent invention, which came into being as the new medium of print imposed divisions between children and adults. But now these divisions are eroding under the barrage of television, which turns the adult secrets of sex and violence into poprular entertainment and pitches both news and advertising at the intellectual level of ten-year-olds.

Informative, alarming, and aphorisitc, The Disappearance of Childhood is a triumph of history and prophecy.
 

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Review: The Disappearance of Childhood

User Review  - Cipriana Leme - Goodreads

I basically read parts of this book for research. The most interesting idea was that childhood is a modern concept and did not exist in the past. Children were viewed as adults or even pets, with little sympathy or concern for their education. Read full review

Review: The Disappearance of Childhood

User Review  - Erik Akre - Goodreads

In his general work, Neil Postman relentlessly and effectively challenges the notion of progress through technology. Through an exploration of technology and literate culture, Postman sounds a strong ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter
3
Chapter
9
The Printing Press and the New Adult
20
The Incunabula of Childhood
37
Childhoods Joumey
52
The Beginning of the End
67
The Total Disclosure Medium
81
The AdultChild
98
The Disappearing Child
120
Six Questions
143
Notes 155
154
63
163
7
173
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Neil Postman was chairman of the department of communication arts at New York University. He passed away in 2003. Steve Powers is an Emmy Award-winning journalist with more than forty-five years experience in broadcast news.

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