The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 62

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Atlantic Monthly Company, 1888 - American literature
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Page 371 - I beg it may be remembered by every gentleman in the room that I this day declare, with the utmost sincerity, I do not think myself equal to the command I am honored with.
Page 104 - Never any more, While I live, Need I hope to see his face As before. Once his love grown chill, Mine may strive : Bitterly we re-embrace, Single still. n. Was it something said, Something done, Vexed him ? was it touch of hand, Turn of head ? Strange ! that very way Love begun : I as little understand Love's decay.
Page 303 - Like a mighty army Moves the Church of God ; Brothers, we are treading Where the saints have trod : We are not divided, All one body we, One in hope and doctrine, One in charity.
Page 623 - TO CONCUR WITH THE DELEGATES OF THE OTHER COLONIES IN DECLARING INDEPENDENCY, AND FORMING FOREIGN ALLIANCES, reserving to this Colony the sole and exclusive right of forming a Constitution and laws for this Colony...
Page 393 - Like a poet hidden In the light of thought, Singing hymns unbidden, Till the world is wrought To sympathy with hopes and fears it heeded not...
Page 419 - For every battle of the warrior is with confused noise, and garments rolled in blood; but this shall be with burning and fuel of fire.
Page 381 - And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them ; and they were sore afraid. 10 And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.
Page 140 - Salpetriere. $1.50. 60. INTERNATIONAL LAW, with Materials for a Code of International Law. By LEONE LEVI, Professor of Common Law, King's College.
Page 371 - MR. PRESIDENT: Though I am truly sensible of the high honor done me, in this appointment, yet I feel great distress, from a consciousness that my abilities and military experience may not be equal to the extensive and important trust. However, as the Congress desire it, I will enter upon the momentous duty, and exert every power I possess in their service, and for the support of the glorious cause.
Page 357 - I will raise one thousand men, subsist them at my own expense, and march myself at their head for the relief of Boston.

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