The Levittowners: Ways of Life and Politics in a New Suburban Community

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Columbia University Press, 1982 - History - 474 pages
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In 1955 Levitt and Sons, Inc. purchased almost all of Willingboro Township, New Jersey, a sparsely settled agricultural area seventeen miles from Philadelphia. They would build 1,200 homes; three basic house types would be erected; ten or twelve neighborhoods would emerge. This suburban experiment was the basis for one of the most famous case studies in urban sociology, Herbert J. Gans' The Levittowners. This classic work examines its subject from numerous angles: the beginnings of group life, the founding of churches, the emergence of party politics, family and individual adaptation, and other dimensions of the suburban experience. In a new introduction, written especially for this edition, Gans reflects on the past twenty years and their effect on the Levittown community.

 

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Contents

VI
3
VII
22
VIII
44
IX
68
X
86
XI
104
XII
124
XIII
151
XVII
252
XVIII
303
XIX
305
XX
333
XXI
368
XXII
408
XXIII
435
XXIV
452

XIV
153
XV
185
XVI
220

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About the author (1982)

Herbert J. Gans is professor of sociology at Columbia University. By profession a planner as well as a sociologist, he is also the author of The Urban Villagers, People and Plans, More Equality, Popular Culture and High Culture, and Deciding What's News.

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