Gender at Work: The Dynamics of Job Segregation by Sex During World War II

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University of Illinois Press, 1987 - Political Science - 213 pages
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"By analyzing the process of work in both the electrical and the automobile industries, the supplies of male and female labor available to each, the varying degrees of labor-intensive work, the proportion of labor costs to total costs, and the extent of male resistance to female entry into the industry before, during, and after the war, Milkman offers a historically grounded and detailed examination of the evolution, function, and reproduction of job segregation by sex."
-- Journal of American History
"Analytic sophistication is coupled with a powerfully rendered narrative: the reader strides briskly along, enjoying one provocative insight after another while simultaneously absorbed by the drama of the events."
-- Women's Review of Books
 

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Contents

Fordism and Feminization
12
The Great Depression and the Triumph of Unionization
27
Redefining Womens Work
49
Wartime Labor Struggles over the Position of Women in Industry
65
The Emergence of a Womens Movement in the Wartime CIO
84
Demobilization and the Reconstruction of Womans Place in Industry
99
Resistance to Managements Postwar Policies
128
Epilogue and Conclusion
153
Notes
161
Index
207
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