The Library

Front Cover
Sir John Young Walker MacAlister, Alfred William Pollard, Ronald Brunlees McKerrow, Sir Frank Chalton Francis
Oxford University Press, 1906 - Bibliography
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Page 28 - I feel not in myself those common antipathies that I can discover in others. Those national repugnances do not touch me, nor do I behold with prejudice the French, Italian, Spaniard, or Dutch...
Page 22 - If the nearness of our last necessity brought a nearer conformity unto it, there were a happiness in hoary hairs, and no calamity in half -senses. But the long habit of living indisposeth us for dying ; when avarice makes us the sport of death, when even David grew politicly cruel, and Solomon could hardly be said to be the wisest of men.
Page 23 - But who knows the fate of his bones, or how often he is to be buried ? Who hath the oracle of his ashes, or whither they are to be scattered?
Page 326 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide: To lose good days, that might be better spent; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow; To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow; To have thy prince's grace, yet want her peers...
Page 355 - Did throng the seats, the boxes, and the stage ; So much, that some by Stenography drew The plot, put it in print, (scarce one word true...
Page 28 - I desire everything in its proper season, that neither men nor the times be put out of temper. Let me be sick myself, if sometimes the malady of my patient be not a disease unto me. I desire rather to cure his infirmities than my own necessities.
Page 361 - To be, or not to be, I there's the point, To Die, to sleepe, is that all? I all: No, to sleepe, to dreame, I mary there it goes, For in that dreame of death, when wee awake, And borne before an...
Page 22 - Oblivion is not to be hired: the greater part must be content to be as though they had not been, to be found in the Register of God, not in the record of man.
Page 2 - Bless not thyself that thou wert born in Athens ; but, among thy multiplied acknowledgments, lift up one hand to heaven that thou wert born of honest parents, that modesty, humility, and veracity lay in the same egg, and came into the world with thee.
Page 24 - To be knaved out of our graves, to have our skulls made drinking-bowls and our bones turned into pipes, to delight and sport our enemies, are tragical abominations, escaped in burning burials.

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