History of ancient pottery

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J. Murray, 1858 - Pottery, Ancient
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Page 3 - Babylon, which critical scepticism had denounced aa fabulous. The Roman bricks have also borne their testimony to history. A large number of them present a series of the names of consuls of imperial Rome ; while others show that the proud nobility of the eternal city partly derived their revenues from the kilns of their Campanian and Sabine farms.
Page 210 - ... size of the vases discovered in that country. At Athens, the earlier graves are sunk deepest in the soil, and those at Corinth, especially such as contain the early Corinthian vases, are found by boring to a depth of several feet beneath the surface. The early tombs of Civita Vecchia and...
Page 283 - The limbs are fuller and thicker, the faces noble, the hair of the head and beard treated with greater breadth and mass, as in the style of the painter Zeuxis, who gave more flesh to his figures, in order to make them appear of greater breadth and more grandiose, adopting the ideas of Homer, who represents even his females of large proportions.
Page 283 - The ornaments are in white, and so are the letters. The figures have lost that hardness which at first characterised them ; the eyes are no longer represented oblique and in profile ; the extremities are finished with greater care, the chin and nose are more rounded, and have lost the extreme elongation of the earlier...
Page 5 - The application of clay to the making of vases probably soon caused the invention of the potter's-wheel, before which period only vessels fashioned by the hand, and of rude unsymmetrical shape, could have been made. But the application of a circular lathe', laid horizontally and revolving on a central pivot, on which the clay was placed, and to which it adhered, was in its day a truly wonderful advance in the art. As the wheel spun round, all combinations of oval, spherical, and cylindrical forms...
Page 242 - In the second style of vases the figures are painted in a dark brown or black, of an unequal tone, on yellow ground, formed of a siliceous coating over the pale red clay of the vase. An improvement upon this style was the changing of the colour of the figures by painting, or stopping out, all the ground of the vase in black, thus leaving the figures of the natural red of the clay, and the marking of the muscles and finer portions, as an outline, of a bright brown. After the paint had dried, the slip,...
Page 371 - At this period there were no European troops in New Spain; and though at a later date Spanish forces were sent into the country, their number was always greatly exceeded by that of the native regiments. Thus the combatants on either side were sons of the soil; and it is necessary to bear this in mind in order to appreciate the critical position in which the viceroy found himself at the outbreak of the rebellion, as well as the political division which existed in the ranks of the oppressed portion...
Page 4 - The materials used for writing on have varied in different ages and nations. Among the Egyptians slices of limestone, leather, linen, and papyrus, especially the last, were universally employed. The Greeks used bronze and stone for public monuments, wax for memorandums, and papyrus for the ordinary transactions of life. The kings of Pergamus adopted parchment, and the other nations of the ancient world chiefly depended on a supply of the paper of Egypt. But the Assyrians and Babylonians employed...
Page 283 - The great charm of these designs is the beauty of the composition, and the more perfect proportion of the figures. The head is an oval, three-quarters of which are comprised from the chin to the ear, thus affording a guide to its proportions, which are far superior to those of the previous figures. The disproportionate shape of the limbs disappears, and the countenance assumes its natural form and expression. The folds of the drapery, too, are freer, and the attitudes have lost their ancient rigidity.
Page 4 - Judah ; and others, exhumed from the Birs Nimrud, give a detailed account of the dedication of the great temple by Nebuchadnezzar to the seven planets. To this indestructible material, and to the happy idea of employing it in this manner, the present age is indebted for a detailed history of the Assyrian monarchy; whilst the decades of Livy, the plays of Menander and the lays of Anacreon, confided to a more perishable material, have either wholly or partly disappeared amidst the wreck of empires.

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