Environmental Ethics: The Big Questions

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David R. Keller
John Wiley & Sons, 2010 - Nature - 581 pages
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Through a series of multidisciplinary readings, Environmental Ethics: The Big Questions contextualizes environmental ethics within the history of Western intellectual tradition and traces the development of theory since the 1970s.
  • Includes an extended introduction that provides an historical and thematic introduction to the field of environmental ethics
  • Features a selection of brief original essays on why to study environmental ethics by leaders in the field
  • Contextualizes environmental ethics within the history of the Western intellectual tradition by exploring anthropocentric (human-centered) and nonanthropocentric precedents
  • Offers an interdisciplinary approach to the field by featuring seminal work from eminent philosophers, biologists, ecologists, historians, economists, sociologists, anthropologists, nature writers, business writers, and others
  • Designed to be used with a web-site which contains a continuously updated archive of case studies:

    http://environmentalethics.info/

     
 

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Contents

WHY STUDY ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS?
25
George Sessions Emily Brady John Granrose Frederick Ferré J Baird Callicott
53
Nonhumans as Machines
69
Indirect Duties to Nonhumans
82
In Defense of Anthropocentrism
83
WHAT IS NONANTHROPOCENTRISM?
89
The Wild Parks and Forest Reservations of the West and Hetch Hetchy Valley
96
Attitudes to Nature
103
A Subjectivist Environmental Ethics
342
The Trouble With Wilderness
359
Environmental Ethics and the Philosophy of Technology
368
WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN
377
What is Conservation Biology?
384
Environmental Ethics and Ecological Science
392
The Metaphysical Implications of Ecology
400
The Ends of the World as We Know Them
409

Should Trees Have Standing? Toward Legal Rights for Natural Objects
110
The Varieties of Intrinsic Value
120
Value in Nature and the Nature of Value
130
The End of Anthropocentrism?
137
Is the Crown of Creation a Dunce Cap?
143
A Individualism Polycentrism
154
Psychocentrism
161
All Animals are Equal
169
Egalitarian Biocentrism
175
Kantians and Utilitarians and the Moral Status of Nonhuman Life
182
B Holism Ecocentrism
193
Gaia As Seen Through the Atmosphere
211
A Environmental Psychologism
230
Transpersonal Ecology
245
Political Environmental Ethics
268
Ecological Feminism
281
Feminism and the Philosophy of Nature
291
E Environmental Pragmatism
311
F Direct Action
327
Introduction
415
A The PopulationPoverty Debate
422
The Ecological Necessity of Confronting the Problem of Human Overpopulation
434
How Poverty Breeds Overpopulation
443
Delusion and Reality
454
A Special Moment in History
469
B Industrial Agriculture
476
Toward a Postmechanistic Agricultural Ethic
481
Socioeconomic Environmental Justice
491
Just Garbage
501
Environmental Ethics and Economic Policy
509
The SteadyState Economy
516
Making Capitalism Sustainable
525
What Must We Know to be Fair to the Future?
534
Environmental Justice and Intergenerational Debt
545
E Globalization
551
WHAT IS THE FUTURE
559
Bibliography
575
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About the author (2010)

David R. Keller is Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Center for the Study of Ethics at Utah Valley University. He is co-editor of The Philosophy of Ecology: From Science to Synthesis (with Frank Golley, 2000), and co-author of Ethics in Action (with Peggy Connolly, Becky Cox-White, and Martin G. Leever, Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), a case-based approach to introducing ethics and environmental issues.

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