The Natural History of Ireland, Volume 2

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Reeve, Benham and Reeve, 1850 - Zoology
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Page 166 - ... in the place where I was a boy with what terror this bird's note affected the whole village ; they considered it as the presage of some sad event ; and generally found or made one to succeed it.
Page 176 - Tis the last remnant of the wreck of years. And looks as with the wild bevvilder'd gaze Of one to stone converted by amaze, Yet still with consciousness ; and there it stands, Making a marvel that it not decays, When the coeval pride of human hands, Levell'd Aventicum, hath strew'd her subject lands.
Page 167 - Those who have walked in an evening by the sedgy sides of unfrequented rivers, must remember a variety of notes from different water-fowl: the loud scream of the wild goose, the croaking of the mallard, the whining of the lapwing, and the tremulous neighing of the jacksnipe. But of all these sounds, there is none so dismally hollow as the booming of the bittern.
Page 31 - A few other writers mention it by the same name, and John Rutty, in 1772, says (Nat. Hist. Dublin, ip 302) that " one was seen in the county of Leitrim about the year 1710, but they have entirely disappeared of late, by reason of the destruction of our woods.
Page 92 - I never hear the loud solitary whistle of the curlew in a summer noon, or the wild mixing cadence of a troop of gray plover in an autumnal morning, without feeling an elevation of soul like the enthusiasm of devotion or poetry.
Page 176 - gainst tears, and hers would crave The life she lived in ; but the judge was just, And then she died on him she could not save. Their tomb was simple, and without a bust, And held within their urn one mind, one heart, one dust.
Page 167 - But of all those sounds, there is none so dismally hollow as the booming of the bittern. It is impossible for words to give those who have not heard this evening call an adequate idea of its solemnity. It is like the interrupted bellowing of a bull, but hollower and louder, and is heard at a mile's distance, as if issuing from some formidable being that resided at the bottom of the waters.
Page 168 - Its windpipe is fitted to produce the sound for which it is remarkable; the lower part of it dividing into the lungs, is supplied with a thin loose membrane, that can be filled with a large body of air, and exploded at pleasure.
Page 166 - I will also make it a possession for the bittern, and pools of water: and I will sweep it with the besom of destruction, saith the Lord of hosts.
Page 66 - Seems to be generally distributed over the old world, though, in the south of Europe, it is perhaps as abundant as elsewhere. In Britain they may now be termed only an occasional visitant, the numbers of those which arrive to breed having considerably decreased, and they are to be met with certainty only in some of the warmer southern or midland counties of England. Thirty years since they were tolerably common and regular in their returns ; and even in the south of Scotland a few broods were occasionally...

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