The Aeneid

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Poetry
57 Reviews
"The Aeneid" is considered by some to be one of the most important epic poems of all time. The story is as much one of the great epic hero, Aeneas, as it is of the foundation of the great Roman Empire. Aeneas, a Trojan Prince who escapes following the fall of troy, travels with others to Italy to lay the foundations for what would become the great Roman Empire. Virgil's Aeneid is a story of great adventure, of war, of love, and of the exploits of a great epic hero. In the work Virgil makes commentary on the state of Rome during the Rule of Augustus. It was a time that had been previously ravaged by civil wars and with the reign of Augustus order and peace had begun to be restored. That order had a price though. Many of the freedoms of the old Roman Republic had been lost under the new Imperialistic Rome. This loss of freedom and the debate over the virtues of a Republican Rome versus an Imperialistic Rome was central to Virgil's time and is interwoven throughout the poetic narrative of "The Aeneid." Virgil's work forms the historical foundation for the argument of the empire over the republic as the best form of government.
 

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Review: The Aeneid

User Review  - Dee - Goodreads

It was quite a journey for me to go back to reading in verse (and in english). Past this barrier, the story was intriguing. There are a lot of reviews explaining better than me what is wrong and right ... Read full review

Review: Aeneid

User Review  - Andrew Diamond - Goodreads

I studied Latin and Greek in high school, and I never had any interest in reading this. My impression of the Roman myths was that they were just a second-rate rehashing of the Greek originals. So I ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

BOOK
5
BOOK II
28
BOOK III
51
p
71
BOOK V
93
BOOK VI
117
BOOK VII
144
BOOK VIII
168
BOOK IX
189
p
213
BOOK XI
241
BOOK XII
269
Copyright

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Page 8 - Within a long recess there lies a bay: An island shades it from the rolling sea, And forms a port secure for ships to ride: Broke by the jutting land, on either side, In double streams the briny waters glide...
Page 27 - ALL were attentive to the godlike man, When from his lofty couch he thus began : "Great queen, what you command me to relate Renews the sad remembrance of our fate...

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About the author (2004)

Virgil was born on October 15, 70 B.C.E., in Northern Italy in a small village near Mantua. He attended school at Cremona and Mediolanum (Milan), then went to Rome, where he studied mathematics, medicine and rhetoric, and finally completed his studies in Naples. He entered literary circles as an "Alexandrian," the name given to a group of poets who sought inspiration in the sophisticated work of third-century Greek poets, also known as Alexandrians. In 49 BC Virgil became a Roman citizen. After his studies in Rome, Vergil is believed to have lived with his father for about 10 years, engaged in farm work, study, and writing poetry. After the battle of Philippi in 42 B.C.E. Virgil┐s property in Cisalpine Gaul, was confiscated for veterans. In the following years Virgil spent most of his time in Campania and Sicily, but he also had a house in Rome. During the reign of emperor Augustus, Virgil became a member of his court circle and was advanced by a minister, Maecenas, patron of the arts and close friend to the poet Horace. He gave Virgil a house near Naples. Between 42 and 37 B.C.E. Virgil composed pastoral poems known as Bucolic or Eclogues and spent years on the Georgics. The rest of his life, from 30 to 19 B.C., Virgil devoted to The Aeneid, the national epic of Rome, and the glory of the Empire. Although ambitious, Virgil was never really happy about the task. Virgil died in 19 B. C.

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