Shadow Dawn

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Bantam Books, 1998 - Fiction - 511 pages
25 Reviews
Wolf Haas' Detective Brenner series has become wildly popular around the world for a reason: They're timely, edgy stories told in a wry, quirky voice that's often hilarious, and with a protagonist it's hard not to love. In this episode, Brenner-forced out of the police force-tries to get away from detective work by taking a job as the personal chauffeur for two-year-old Helena, the daughter of a Munich construction giant and a Viennese abortion doctor. One day, while Brenner's attention is turned to picking out a chocolate bar for Helena at a gas station, Helena gets snatched from the car. Abruptly out of a job, Brenner decides to investigate her disappearance on his own. With both parents in the public eye, there's no scarcity of leads-the father's latest development project has spurred public protest, and the mother's clinic has been targeted by the zealous leader of an anti-abortion group. Brenner and God is told with a dark humor that leaves no character, including Brenner, unscathed. Haas tells the story of a fallible hero who can be indecisive and world-weary, baffled and disillusioned by what he finds, but who presses forward nonetheless out of a stubborn sense of decency-a two-year-old is kidnapped, so you find her, because that's just what you do.

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Review: Shadow Dawn (Chronicles of the Shadow War #2)

User Review  - Cathy Smith - Goodreads

I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads. Another brilliant book, the second in the series. I had to use my imagination a bit to connect the first book to the second. It seems like ... Read full review

Review: Shadow Dawn (Chronicles of the Shadow War #2)

User Review  - Vincent Asaro - Goodreads

Shadow Dawn isn't as strong as its prequel (Shadow Moon) or its sequel (Shadow Star) but it's still very good for 90's fantasy. As with the entire trilogy, the content is really unique, avoiding the ... Read full review

All 13 reviews »

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
38
Section 3
73
Copyright

17 other sections not shown

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About the author (1998)

Chris Claremont is one of the bestselling comic writers in the world. He wrote The Uncanny X-Men for seventeen years as well as the novelization of the movie X-Men 2. He has been the co-creator of several top-selling series for Marvel Comics, including Excalibur, Wolverine, New Mutants, and, in the United Kingdom, Captain Britain. He wrote the Star Trek twenty-fifth-anniversary graphic novel Debt of Honor and a Next Generation sequel, Cry, Vengeance, for DC Comics, as well as" "Alien/Predator: The Deadliest of Species for Dark Horse. His debut novel was Firstflight, the story of a young female astronaut in the twenty-first century, to which he wrote two sequels, Grounded and Sundowner. He collaborated with George Lucas on three novels in The Chronicles of the Shadow War, and has delved into fantasy with the publication of Dragon Moon, a dark fantasy novel co-authored with his wife, Beth Fleisher. The couple lives in Brooklyn with their two children.

George Walton Lucas, Jr. (born May 14, 1944) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, and entrepreneur. He founded Lucasfilm and led the company as chairman and chief executive before selling it to The Walt Disney Company on October 30, 2012. As a graduate of the prestigious Cinema Studies program of the University of Southern California, George Lucas represents the movie-educated generation of American filmmakers, which emerged in the 1970's, including Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, and Brian DePalma. Lucas's award-winning 20-minute student science fiction film, "THX-1138," and a student fellowship to work with Coppola, launched a career of unprecedented financial success. Backed by Coppola, he made a feature-length version of "THX-1138" (1971), then gained wide recognition with the release of "American Graffiti" (1973), a look at high school in 1962 whose rock-and-roll soundtrack set off a wave of 1950's nostalgia. Made for $750,000, "American Graffiti" grossed nearly $50 million. However, Lucas's "Star Wars" (1977) broke all box-office records and defined the basic terms of Lucas's legacy: Spectacular technical effects and a comic-book sense of adventure. Lucas wrote the scenarios for the "Star Wars" sequels, "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980) and "Return of the Jedi" (1983), and later for the "Indiana Jones" films, but he handed over directing to others. The American Film Institute awarded Lucas its Life Achievement Award on June 9, 2005. He has been nominated for four Academy Awards: Best Directing and Writing for American Graffiti, and Best Directing and Writing for Star Wars. He received the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Award in 1991. The Discovery Channel named him one of the 100 "Greatest Americans" in September 2008. In July 2013, Lucas was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Barack Obama for his contributions to American cinema.

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