The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit, Volume 9

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1951 - Fiction - 841 pages
Regarded by Dickens himself as his best novel upon publication, the experiences of Martin Chuzzlewit relate a tale of familial selfishness and eventual moral redemption. While he is in love with the young Mary Graham, Martin alienates himself from his grandfather and begins working for the corrupt and dishonest Seth Pecksniff. Though he meets the unequivocally kind Tom Pinch during this apprenticeship, Martin is fired and decides to travel to the United States, where he nearly dies. It is in the swampy land of Eden, however, that he reforms, and upon return the crimes of other characters in Dickens's exceptional cast of characters are revealed, particularly those of the arch-villain Jonas Chuzzlewit. A dark comedy full of greed, manipulation, and duplicity intertwined with humility and selfless kindness, "Martin Chuzzlewit" is an exemplary story that carries a timeless message for its readers.

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User Review  - denmoir - LibraryThing

Every now and then, disillusioned by modern literature, I return to Dickens. I have just read "Our Mutual Friend" Dickens wonderful word pictures of people, every character vivid and believable is far beyond anyone writing today. Read full review

Contents

Introductory concerning the Pedigree of the Chuzzlewit
1
Wherein certain Persons are presented to the Reader with
7
In which certain other Persons are introduced on the same
25

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About the author (1951)

Charles Dickens (1812-70) is one of England's greatest novelists. Born into a poor family (his father was once imprisoned for debt), Dickens became both rich and famous in his lifetime.

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