An History of Ireland, from the Year 1599, to 1603: With a Short Narration of the State of the Kingdom from the Year 1169. To which is Added, a Description of Ireland, Volume 1

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S. Powell, 1735 - Ireland
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Page 94 - We must, therefore, let you know, that as it cannot be ignorance, so it cannot be want of means ; for you had your asking : you had choice of times, — you had power and authority, more ample than ever any had, or ever shall have. It may well be judged with how little contentment...
Page 94 - ... that be hidden which is so palpable? And, therefore, to leave that which is past, and that you may prepare to remedy matters of weight hereafter, rather than to fill your papers with many impertinent arguments, being in your...
Page 84 - ... disadvantages together, you shall finde, that though these rebels are more in number than your majesties army, and have (though I doe unwillingly confesse it) better bodies and perfecter use of their armes, than those men which your majesty sends over ; yet your majesty, commanding the walled townes...
Page 84 - ... so that although their common soldiers are too hard for our new men, yet are they not able to stand before such gallant men as will charge them. Sixthly, your...
Page 108 - ... and using these rightly as pastimes, only for a short and convenient time, and with great variety of change from one to the other.
Page 93 - If sickness of the army be the reason, why was not the action undertaken when the army was in better state ? if winter's approach, why were the summer months of July and August lost ? if the spring were too soon, and the summer that followed otherwise spent ? if the harvest that succeeded were so neglected, as nothing hath been done, then surely we must conclude that none of the four quarters of the year will be in season for you and that council to agree...
Page 85 - I can never goe in a better time, nor in a fairer way. Till then, I protest before God and his angels, that I am a true votarie, that is sequestered from all things but my duty and my charge: I...
Page 225 - Elizabeth by the Grace of God Queen of England France and Ireland Defender of the Faith &c.
Page 95 - ... army, which we command you to reform, especially since you, by your continual reports of the state of every province, describe them all to be in worse condition than ever they were before you set foote in that kingdom.
Page 368 - ... to Cecil, enables us to catch a distant gleam of his personal character and conduct, which must gratify the reader. " Having been up most of the night, it groweth now about four o'clock in the morning, at which time I lightly chuse to visit our guards myself ; and am now going about that business, in a morning as cold as a stone and as dark as pitch. And I pray, sir, think whether this be a life that I take much delight in, who heretofore in England, when I have had a suit to the queen, could...

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