Did Somebody Say Totalitarianism?: Five Interventions in the (mis)use of a Notion

Front Cover
Verso, 2002 - Philosophy - 280 pages
1 Review
Totalitarianism, as an ideological notion, has always had a precise strategic function: to guarantee the liberal-democratic hegemony by dismissing the Leftist critique of liberal democracy as the obverse, the twin, of the Rightist Fascist dictatorships. Instead of providing yet another systematic exposition of the history of this notion, _i_ek’s book addresses totalitarianism in a Wittgensteinian way, as a cobweb of family resemblances. He concludes that the devil lies not so much in the detail of what constitutes totalitarianism as in what enables the very designation totalitarian: the liberal-democratic consensus itself.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
8
III
61
V
88
VII
190
IX
229
X
257
XI
273
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Slavoj Žižek is a Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic. He is a professor at the European Graduate School, International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London, and a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. His books include Living in the End Times, First as Tragedy, Then as Farce, In Defense of Lost Causes, four volumes of the Essential Žižek, and many more.

Bibliographic information