The Maid of France: Being the Story of the Life and Death of Jeanne D' Arc

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Jun 1, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 380 pages
0 Reviews
1909. While best known for his translations of classical literature and as a collector of folk and fairy tales, Lang also wrote poetry, biographies, histories, novels, literary criticisms and even children's books. In this work, Lang gives both the believer's and the skeptic's side as to the explanation of Joan of Arc's experiences. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
14
III
22
IV
35
V
43
VI
52
VII
58
VIII
64
IX
73
XIX
188
XX
198
XXI
207
XXII
215
XXIII
226
XXIV
242
XXV
252
XXVI
265

X
88
XI
95
XII
106
XIII
116
XIV
125
XV
138
XVI
150
XVII
165
XVIII
179
XXVII
273
XXVIII
276
XXIX
280
XXX
282
XXXI
293
XXXII
297
XXXIII
341
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 48 - The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but knowest not whence it cometh, and whither it goeth : so is every one that is born of the Spirit.
Page 25 - gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long...
Page 13 - To reject abundance of sworn evidence because it conflicts with a critic's personal idea of what is probable or possible is not the method of history, and will not be adopted in this book. Much less will I reject, for instance, the evidence of Jeanne herself on any point, and give a fanciful theory of my own as to what really occurred. If there are incidents in her career which science, so far, cannot explain, I shall not therefore regard them as false. Science may be able to explain them on some...
Page 4 - A girl understood, and a girl employed (so professional students of strategy and tactics declare), the essential ideas of the military art ; namely, to concentrate quickly, to strike swiftly, to strike hard, to strike at vital points, and, despising vain noisy skirmishes and " valiances," to fight with invincible tenacity of purpose.

References to this book

About the author (2007)

Andrew Lang was born at Selkirk in Scotland on March 31, 1844. He was a historian, poet, novelist, journalist, translator, and anthropologist, in connection with his work on literary texts. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy, St. Andrews University, and Balliol College, Oxford University, becoming a fellow at Merton College. His poetry includes Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), Ballades in Blue China (1880--81), and Grass of Parnassus (1888--92). His anthropology and his defense of the value of folklore as the basis of religion is expressed in his works Custom and Myth (1884), Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887), and The Making of Religion (1898). He also translated Homer and critiqued James G. Frazer's views of mythology as expressed in The Golden Bough. He was considered a good historian, with a readable narrative style and knowledge of the original sources including his works A History of Scotland (1900-7), James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902), and Sir George Mackenzie (1909). He was one of the most important collectors of folk and fairy tales. His collections of Fairy books, including The Blue Fairy Book, preserved and handed down many of the better-known folk tales from the time. He died of angina pectoris on July 20, 1912.

Bibliographic information