The U.S.-Japan Security Alliance: Why it Matters and how to Strengthen it

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002 - Political Science - 106 pages

For more than three decades, the multifaceted alliance between the United States and Japan has contributed significantly to the security of Japan and the maintenance of peace and security in the Far East. With the end of the Cold War, new sources of potential threats have arisen at a time when Japan's national self-confidence has been shaken by nearly a decade of economic stagnation, a highly fluid political situation, and an inadequate institutional structure for crisis management and strategy formulation. Osius examines how Japan is trying to redefine its identity from a nation whose constitution renounces war as a sovereign right to a normal country involved in United Nations peacekeeping operations and regional military relationships.

In his initial chapters, Osius focuses on the purpose of the security alliance and argues that U.S.-Japanese interests coincide enough not only to sustain the alliance, but also to warrant strengthening and promoting it. He then examines the challenges and opportunities for an enhanced alliance over the next decade. Together, he maintains, the United States and Japan can address broadly defined security concerns, such as energy supply, weapons of mass destruction proliferation, transborder crime, piracy, and illegal narcotics, as well as environmental issues, infectious disease, economic development, and humanitarian and disaster relief. However, if it is to thrive, the U.S.-Japan alliance must remain dynamic rather than static and must be nurtured, sustained, and enhanced by both parties. An important analysis for policy makers, scholars, and students of U.S.-Japanese political and military relations and Asian Studies in general.

 

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Contents

Defense of Japan
1
Contemporary Examples
2
US and Japanese Interests
6
The Korean Peninsula
9
Japanese Interests
11
The Current Situation on the Peninsula
13
Options for the Future
14
A New Deal?
15
Security Communities
49
Humanitarian Activities
50
The Problem of Okinawa A Shared Challenge
53
The Burden
55
Reducing the Impact
58
Options for the Future
61
Economic Development
62
Discussing Why the Bases Matter
63

The China Factor
18
Taiwan
22
Fear of Entrapment
24
The CrossStrait Situation
27
Options for the Future
28
China
32
US Interests
33
Japanese Interests
35
Options for the Future
37
Human Rights
39
Energy and the Environment
40
The East Asian Region
44
US and Japanese Interests in Southeast Asia
45
Options for the Future
46
Japanese and US Challenges and Opportunities
66
Peacekeeping
69
The Role of Japans SelfDefense Forces
70
Americas Challenge
73
Americas Opportunity
74
Opportunities for a Strengthened Alliance
81
A New Strategic Framework
83
Theater Missile Defense
87
Chinas Opposition
89
Transnational and Multinational Cooperation
90
Bibliography
93
Index
99
About the Author
Copyright

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Page 93 - Dennis C. Blair and John T. Hanley, "From Wheels to Webs: Reconstructing Asia-Pacific Security Arrangements,

About the author (2002)

TED OSIUS is the State Departments' regional environmental affairs officer for Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

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