Rhymes, Reasons, and Recollections from the Common-place-books of a Sexagenarian

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S.W. Partridge, 1876 - 117 pages
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Page 36 - That not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom...
Page 2 - There is no art or science that is too difficult for industry to attain to; it is the gift of tongues, and makes a man understood and valued in all countries...
Page 47 - Truths, of all others the most awful and interesting, are too often considered as so true, that they lose all the power of truth, and lie bed-ridden in the dormitory of the soul, side by side with the most despised and exploded errors.
Page 35 - ... intentions, will be found exactly conformable to the precepts of Christianity, without any accommodation to the licentiousness and levity of the present age. I therefore look back on this part of my work with pleasure. which no [blame or praise of] man shall diminish or augment.
Page 97 - That a lie which is half a truth is ever the blackest of lies, That a lie which is all a lie may be met and fought with outright, But a lie which is part a truth is a harder matter to fight.
Page 53 - ... if any man will do the will of God, he shall know of the doctrine whether it be of God.
Page 28 - ... wonted course. Make sobriety a habit, and intemperance will be hateful and hard, — make prudence a habit, and reckless profligacy will be as contrary to the nature of the child grown an adult, as the most atrocious crimes are to any of your Lordships. Give a child the habit of sacredly regarding...
Page 106 - Some indeed of the articles consumed admit of being reserved in public or private stores for a considerable time ; but many, including most articles of animal food, and many of vegetable, are of the most perishable nature. As a deficient...
Page 12 - ... for himself, and those dependent on him, a comfortable subsistence before he can have a right to taste any indulgence, either of his senses or of his mind ; and the more he learns — the greater progress he makes in the sciences — the more will he value that independence, and the more will he prize the industry, the habits of regular labour, whereby he is enabled to secure so prime a blessing. In one view, it is true, the progress which he makes in science may help his ordinary exertions,...
Page 93 - Tibullus erit. 60 obvius huic venias hedera iuvenalia cinctus tempora cum Calvo, docte Catulle, tuo ; tu quoque, si falsum est temerati crimen amici, sanguinis atque animae prodige Galle tuae. his comes umbra tua est ; siqua est modo corporis umbra, 65 auxisti numeros, culte Tibulle, pios. ossa quieta, precor, tuta requiescite in urna, et sit humus cineri non onerosa tuo ! ANNUA venerunt Cerealis tempora sacri ; secubat in vacuo sola puella toro.

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