North Star Country: Upstate New York and the Crusade for African American Freedom

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Syracuse University Press, 2002 - History - 369 pages
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The compelling and wide-ranging tale that examines the moral choices made by blacks and whites of New York State to aid the newly freed slaves to secure the promise of freedom. The North Star was both an astronomical reference guiding slaves north to freedom, and a symbol of the moral enterprise that sought to end slavery. This crusade for freedom in the north was born of the religious revivals of the 1820s and 1830s in central and western New York - known as the Burned-Over District, which lit the fires that eventually burst into the conflagration of the Civil War. Milton C. Sernett begins with a history of slavery in upstate New York and ends with John Brown's execution and burial in the Adirondacks. He includes great abolitionists - among them Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Gerrit Smith, Beriah Green, Jermain Lougen, and Samuel May - and many lesset-known characters who rescued fugitives from slave hunters, maintained safe houses along the Underground Railroad, and otherwise furthered the cause of freedom.
 

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Contents

Slavery and the Burnedover District
3
The Awakening
24
Into the Storm
49
Trouble in Gods House
77
Bible Politics
104
The Turbulent 1850s
129
Moses and Her People
162
Michigan Street Baptist Church Buffalo
186
John Browns Body
195
Gerrit Smith mansion Peterboro
207
Battlefields and Home Fronts
222
Lewis Henry Douglass
243
Edmonia Highgates grave Syracuse
261
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About the author (2002)

Milton C. Sernett is professor of African American Studies and History at Syracuse University.

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