A General History of Voyages and Travels to the End of the 18th Century

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J. Ballantyne & Company, 1811
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Page 355 - ... when she pleases. These mistresses are all gentlewomen of the Nayre caste : and the Nayres, besides being prohibited from marrying, must not attach themselves to any woman of a different rank. Considering that there are always several men attached to one woman, the Nayres never look upon any of the children born of their mistresses as belonging to them, however strong a resemblance may subsist, and all inheritances among the Nayres go to their brothers, or the sons of their sisters, born of the...
Page 447 - ... those days. After his arrival at Goa, the viceroy visited some forts, and issued the necessary orders for regulating the affairs of his government ; but he had not time to put any of his great designs into execution, as he died on Christmas eve, having only held the government of Portuguese India for three months. De Gama is said to have been of middle stature, with a ruddy complexion, but somewhat gross. His character was bold, patient under fatigue, well fitted for great undertakings, speedy...
Page 366 - The procession again set out, preceded by many trumpets and sacbuts sounding all the way ; and one of the nayres carried a caliver, which he fired oft at intervals.
Page 355 - By the laws of their country these Nayres cannot marry, so that no one has any certain or acknowledged son or father ; all their children being born of mistresses, with each of whom three or four Nayres cohabit by agreement among themselves. Each one of this cofraternity dwells a day in his turn with the joint mistress, counting from noon of one day to the same time of the next, after which he departs, and another comes for the like time. Thus they spend their time without the care or trouble of...
Page 150 - This city is not so large as Tauris, but, as far as I could judge, surpasses that place in the goodness and abundance of every thing, especially in excellent cattle. It produces great quantities of excellent silk, of which they manufacture various kinds of very slight stuffs. While here, I had the good fortune to be rejoined by Marcus Ruffus, the Muscovite ambassador, who had parted from me at Phasis, as formerly related. Immediately on learning that I was in the city, he came to visit me, and we...
Page 355 - They thus spend their lives without the care or trouble of wives and children, yet maintain their mistresses well according to their rank. Any one may forsake his mistress at his pleasure ; and in like manner, the mistress may refuse admittance to any one of her lovers when she pleases. These mistresses are all gentlewomen of the Nayre...
Page 24 - ... dedicated it to Sir Robert Cecil, Principal Secretary of State to Queen Elizabeth. It was afterwards inserted in Osbornes, or the Oxford Collection of Voyages and Travels, and forms an appendix to the first volume of Clarke's Progress of Maritime Discovery; and from these sources the present edition has been carefully prepared. Of Richard Hakluyt, the original translator, the following notice is worthy of being preserved. "The great Richard Hakluyt was descended from an ancient family at Yetton...
Page 16 - ... night completed the horror of the scene. In their confusion the intended port was missed, or could not be reached ; their vessel drove at the mercy of the winds ; and in the morning they found themselves in the midst of an unknown ocean, without the skill that could determine their situation, or the experience that could direct their course. The dawn of twelve mornings returned without the sight of land : when at length, after a night of increased anxiety, as they eagerly watched the earliest...
Page 204 - ... and the adventurer. In case of no returns, the prince was at the entire expence of the voyage ; but that it was hardly possible to make the voyage without great profit. They added, that the prince would be much pleased to have any Venetian in his service, and would shew him great favour, being of opinion that spices and other rich merchandise might be found in these parts, and knowing that the Venetians understood these commodities better than any other nation.
Page 240 - They ceased to row, raised their oars, and looked upon the caravel with wonder. There were between an hundred and thirty and an hundred and fifty negroes, all well made, of a good size and very black. They wore white cotton shirts on their bodies, and white caps on their heads, like the Germans, but with a wing on each side, and a feather in the middle, by which they distinguished themselves to be soldiers of war. At the prow of each Almadia, there stood a...

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