The Congressional Globe ...

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Printed at the Globe Office for the editors, 1844 - United States
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Page 57 - Red river ; then following the course of the Rio Roxo westward, to the degree of longitude 100 west from London, and 23 from Washington ; then crossing the said Red river, and running thence by a line due north, to the river Arkansas ; thence following the course of the southern bank of the Arkansas, to its source, in latitude 42 north: and thence by that parallel of latitude to the south sea.
Page 39 - September last, shall be disposed of for the common benefit of the United States, and be settled and formed into distinct republican States, which shall become members of the Federal Union, and have the same rights of sovereignty, freedom, and independence, as the other States...
Page 21 - Act supplementary to the act entitled "an Act to establish the Treasury Department." Be it enacted . . . That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Treasury to digest, prepare and lay before Congress at the commencement of every session, a report on the subject of finance, containing estimates of the public revenue and public expenditures, and plans for improving or increasing the revenues, from time to time, for the purpose of giving information to Congress in adopting modes of raising the...
Page 21 - Treasury to digest and prepare plans for the improvement and management of the revenue, and for the support of public credit...
Page 21 - Nations or States are bodies politic ; societies of men united together for the purpose of promoting their mutual safety and advantage, by the joint efforts of their mutual strength. Such a society has her affairs and her interests; she deliberates and takes resolutions in common; thus becoming a moral person, who possesses an understanding and a will peculiar to herself.
Page 72 - The Constitution has made no provision for our holding foreign territory, still less for incorporating foreign nations into our Union. The Executive, in seizing the fugitive occurrence which so much advances the good of their country, have done an act beyond the Constitution.
Page 178 - And Lot lifted up his eyes, and beheld all the plain of Jordan, that it was well watered every where, before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah, even as the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt, as thou comest unto Zoar.
Page 110 - Resolved that provision ought to be made for the admission of States lawfully arising within the limits of the United States, whether from a voluntary junction of Government and Territory or otherwise, with the consent of a number of voices in the National legislature less than the whole.
Page 166 - being well understood, that this agreement is not to be construed to the prejudice of any claim, which either of the two high contracting parties may have to any part of the said country, nor shall it be taken to affect the claims of any other Power or State to any part of the said country; the only object of the high contracting parties, in that respect, 'being to prevent disputes and differences amongst themselves.
Page 65 - Parma, the colony or province of Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain, and that it had when France possessed it, and such as it should be after the treaties subsequently entered into between Spain and other States.

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