The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge

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Project Gutenberg, 2000 - Fiction - 20 pages
7 Reviews

"The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge" is one of the fifty-six Sherlock Holmes short stories written by British author Arthur Conan Doyle. One of eight stories in the cycle collected as His Last Bow, it is a lengthy, two-part story consisting of "The Singular Experience of Mr. John Scott Eccles" and "The Tiger of San Pedro", which on original publication in The Strand bore the collective title of "A Reminiscence of Mr. Sherlock Holmes".

Out of the entire collection of Holmes stories by Doyle, this is the only story in which a police inspector (specifically, Inspector Baynes) is as competent as Holmes. Holmes has nothing but praise for Inspector Baynes, believing that he will rise high in his profession, for he has instinct and intuition. Inspector Lestrade never received this kind of appreciation from Holmes.

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Review: The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge

User Review  - Collin A. - Goodreads

Aside from the occasional racially-tinged passage, The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge is easily one if the best Holmes stories above read. What truly establishes this story as a testament to Doyle's ... Read full review

Review: The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge

User Review  - Michelle - Goodreads

A quick read, and a good one. Some racist references to skip past, mar an otherwise delightfully twisting, turning story. Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 ? 7 July 1930) was a Scottish physician and writer, most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, generally considered a milestone in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels.

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Conan Doyle was friends for a time with Harry Houdini, the American magician who himself became a prominent opponent of the Spiritualist movement in the 1920s following the death of his beloved mother. Although Houdini insisted that Spiritualist mediums employed trickery (and consistently exposed them as frauds), Conan Doyle became convinced that Houdini himself possessed supernatural powers?a view expressed in Conan Doyle's The Edge of the Unknown. Houdini was apparently unable to convince Conan Doyle that his feats were simply illusions, leading to a bitter public falling out between the two.