Anti-slav Political Writings, 1833-1860

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C. Bradley Thompson
M.E. Sharpe, 2015 - SOCIAL SCIENCE
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Thompson's selection of aboloitionist essays chronicles the ideological transitions leading up to the Civil War within the movement itself. Authors range from William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick ... Read full review

Contents

The Patriarchal Institution as Described by Members of Its Own Family 1860
3
Lecture on Slavery No 1 1850
24
Selections from Slavery 1836
31
Declaration of Sentiments of the National AntiSlavery Convention 1833
41
Selections from Lectures on Slavery and its Remedy 1834
46
An Address to the Abolitionists of Massachusetts on the Subject of Political Action 1838
63
A Letter on the Political Obligation of Abolitionists with a Reply by William Lloyd Garrison 1839
75
Talk About Political Party 1842
98
Speech on Our Present AntiSlavery Duties 1850
170
Moral Responsibility of Statesmen 1854
187
What Is My Duty as an AntiSlavery Voter? and Fremont and Dayton 1856
202
House Divided Speech at Springfield Illinois 1858
212
Address to the Slaves of the United States of America 1843
223
No Compromise With Slavery 1854
230
No Rights No Duties Or Slaveholders as Such Have No Rights Slaves as Such Owe No Duties 1860
246
A Plan for the Abolition of Slavery 1858
261

Lecture Showing the Necessity for a Liberty Party and Setting Forth Its Principles Measures and Object 1844
107
Address of the Macedon Convention 1847
114
Slavery and the Constitution 1849
133
The Constitution of the United States Is It ProSlavery or AntiSlavery? 1860
144
The Two Altars Or Two Pictures in One 1851
159
Selected Bibliography
265
Index
269
About the Editor
291
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Page xiv - Deep rooted prejudices entertained by the whites; ten thousand recollections, by the blacks, of the injuries they have sustained; new provocations; the real distinctions which nature has made; and many other circumstances, will divide us into parties, and produce convulsions which will probably never end but in the extermination of the one or the other race.

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