Varia

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Page 261 - Damascus, lived at the end of the fifth and the beginning of the sixth century of the present era, the question as to the source of his.
Page 258 - Huns, a polite and warlike people, who possessed the commercial cities of Bochara and Samarcand, who had vanquished the Persian monarch, and carried their victorious arms along the banks, and perhaps to the mouth, of the Indus.
Page 145 - Aeneadum genetrix, hominum divumque voluptas, alma Venus, caeli subter labentia signa quae mare navigerum, quae terras frugiferentis concelebras, per te quoniam genus omne animantum concipitur visitque exortum lumina solis...
Page 211 - Jhelam or Hydaspes below Barahmula. In the Plate of Monograms (IX.) I have included all that I could find on the coins of Moas and of the Vonones family. But I have been obliged to be content >with a selection of the very numerous monograms on the coins of Azas and Azilises. Some day, perhaps, a key may be found to unlock the mystery which lies hidden in these little knots of letters. When I made an attempt nearly twenty years ago to unravel some of the monograms on the Greek coins of Bactria and...
Page 253 - Gollas, whom I would identify with Mihir-gul. In all these different authors I find the record of a great foreign conqueror in the end of the fifth and beginning of the sixth century AD, who ruled over the Panjab, and invaded Northern India, where he reigned for upwards 'of fifteen years, as the Gwalior inscription of his minister from the temple of the sun is dated in the fifteenth year of his reign. As I have already identified his father, Toram&na, with Jabuna or Jabula, the first Scythian king...
Page 139 - Veda, xii. 1 — 12, its full belief is announced, " The Earth is the mother, and I am the son of the Earth ; Parjanya is the Father."5 From Herodotus, iv. 59, we learn that the Scythians made the Earth the wife of Zeus.
Page 250 - The only era that seems possible is that of Saka, which a Scythian might be supposed likely to adopt. By adding the omitted hundreds to make 452 Saka, we get 530 AD, which is a possible date, although I should have preferred an earlier one. The only remarkable date in the history of the White Huns which I can suggest is the final expulsion of the Sassanians from the countries to the north of the Oxus by Chu-khan in AD 456 or 457.
Page 47 - Kadphises offer little variety. The reverses, without a single exception, are confined to the worship of the Indian god, Siva. On some, the god is represented standing alone, holding a trident in his right hand, with the tiger's skin on his left arm, and a water vessel in the hand. On others he is accompanied by his bull, Nandi. On the small gold coins, quarter dindrs, the type is simply the trident of Mahadeva with the axe attached to the side.
Page 253 - Kosmas Indikopleustes, who travelled in AD 522 — 530, names the king of the White Huns Oollas, whom I would identify with Mihir-gul. In all these different authors I find the record of a great foreign conqueror in the end of the fifth and beginning of the sixth century AD, who ruled over the Panjab, and invaded Northern India, where he reigned for upwards of fifteen years, as the Gwalior inscription of his minister from the temple of the sun is dated in the fifteenth year of his reign.
Page 273 - Gurgaii, the ancient Hyrkania, the power of the Kushans was much weakened, and their dominions became limited to Balkh and Kabul. In the beginning of the sixth century the King of Kipin was at war with the King of the White Huns who held Peshawar. Of Kujula Kadphises and Wema Kadphises the only remains are their coins, and the brief notices of the Chinese annalists. But of Kanishka and his two successors Huvishka and Vasu Deva, we possess several inscriptions, most of which are dated, the dates ranging...

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