A Residence in Jutland, the Danish Isles, and Copenhagen, Volume 1

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J. Murray, 1860 - Copenhagen (Denmark)
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Page 354 - It was on that fearful Friday when our Saviour hung in his agony upon the cross, when the sun was turned into blood, and darkness was upon all the earth, that three birds, flying from east to west, passed by the accursed hill of Golgotha. First came the lapwing ; and when the bird saw the sight before him, he flew round about the cross, crying in his querulous tone, ' Piin ham ! piin ham ! Torment him ! torment him.
Page 52 - my sovereign had known it was a beard you required, he could have sent you a goat ; at any rate, my beard is of older date than your protectorate.
Page 211 - Peter consents ; the peasant causes two lofty hillocks of sand to be erected, and then cutting the chains let the bells fall down gently, one after the other. The plan succeeded, and the man claims his reward. " Yes," answers Gyldenstierne, " I will perform my promise and provide handsomely for your wife and children; but for yourself, a traitor to your country, you shall take the place of the bells.
Page 212 - I understand a law is about to be passed forbidding this custom. wrecked off the coast, by the Nissum Fiorde. It fell, however, tongue uppermost, and lies imbedded in the sand; when the tide is low on a summer's eve, its music may still be heard by the fishermen who ply their crafts on the water; such music, so beautiful, they say the like was never heard. As for the other bell, her tones are sad and melancholy : no wonder — ehe wants to come down to her sister.
Page 9 - Anders Bedel, the parson, in his funeral sermon, declared, " had he abstained from wine-bibbing he might have now been alive and in good health.
Page 207 - When he has finished these slices, she gives him his rightful supper as well, adding, " Now, good dog, you shall run loose this night, for in a season when there is peace and good- will upon earth, you will surely harm no one.
Page 387 - ... hundred and thirty pounds yearly. The prioress receives an income of about six hundred pounds English. If any member dies or marries, she forfeits her entrance-money. The ten sisters highest on the list have apartments assigned to them in the convent : they have, of course, their own private room ; but the drawing-rooms are lighted up of an evening, and they dine together, enjoy their own parson, own doctor, own equipages ; a beautiful garden, with greenhouses and a deer-park; — live among...
Page 391 - ... of Zealand, founded by King Skiold, son of Odin. He arrived in a ship from afar. At this time all Denmark was sad, for the King had no son, and the Danes knew not whom they should choose as a successor, when, one day, as they nocked down to the sea-shore, they observed in the distance a sail as it approached the land. It was evidently a ship royal. The mast was of gold ; it had silken sails, and was laden with great riches of gold and silver. Upon the deck of the vessel lay a beautiful child,...
Page 391 - ... ii) gives the following version of the Legend of King Skiold : ' Ledreburg, planted on a height, overlooking a deep valley, possesses a deep historic interest, for it stands on the site of the ancient Leira, stronghold of pagan worship in the island of Zealand, founded by King Skiold, son of Odin. He arrived in a ship from afar. At this time all Denmark was sad, for the King had no son, and the Danes knew not whom they should choose as a successor, when, one day, as they nocked down to the sea-shore,...
Page 355 - To this tradition the Swedes add a fourth bird, the turtle-dove, who, perching on the cross in its anguish, cried, "Kurrie! Kurrie ! Kurrie !" (Lord ! Lord !). Since that day the dove has never been glad, but flies through the forest still repeating its sad notes. pupils, who gave for explanation that he once had a robin die in his hand, and the saying is, that in such a case the hand will always shake. The ill-luck attending the killing...

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