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Books Books 1 - 10 of 11 on The first error and the worst lay at her door. It was foolish, it was wrong, to take....
" The first error and the worst lay at her door. It was foolish, it was wrong, to take so active a part in bringing any two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick of what ought to... "
Emma: A Novel. In Three Volumes - Page 292
by Jane Austen - 1816
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The Novels of Jane Austen, Volume 7

Jane Austen - 1905
...so active a part in bringing any two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious — a trick of what ought to be simple. She was (juite concerned and ashamed, and resolved to do such things no more. ' Here have I,' said she, ' actually...
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Desire and Domestic Fiction: A Political History of the Novel

Nancy Armstrong - Desire in literature - 1987 - 300 pages
...tradition and custom. For committing this female error of reading character, Emma must chastise herself: "Here have I," said she, "actually talked poor Harriet...attached to this man. She might never have thought of him with hope, if I had not assured her of his attachment, for she is as modest and humble as I used to...
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Desire and Domestic Fiction: A Political History of the Novel

Nancy Armstrong - Desire in literature - 1987 - 300 pages
...so active a part in bringing any two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick of what ought to be simple. She [Emma] was quite concerned and ashamed, and resolved to do such things no more. (p. 83) There is a...
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Dangerous Intimacies: Toward a Sapphic History of the British Novel

Lisa Moore - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 191 pages
...so active a part in bringing any two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick...and ashamed, and resolved to do such things no more" (93). Instead of exerting passive influence within the feminine space demarcated by die hierarchies...
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The Talk in Jane Austen

Bruce Stovel, Lynn Weinlos Gregg, Jane Austen Society of North America - Social Science - 2002 - 269 pages
...so active a part in bringing any two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick...and ashamed, and resolved to do such things no more. (136—37) The phrase "quite concerned and ashamed" signals that Emma's discoveries have barely made...
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The Wisdom of Jane Austen

Shawna Mullen - Self-Help - 2003 - 203 pages
...whatever you say always comes to pass. Pray do not make any more matches." Mr. Woodhouse, EM much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick of what ought to be simple. EM "And you have forgotten one matter of joy to me," said Emma, "and a very considerable one — that...
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Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory

Peggy DesAutels, Margaret Urban Walker - Philosophy - 2004 - 245 pages
...so active a part in bringing any two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick...and ashamed, and resolved to do such things no more" (137). These sentiments seem to echo and endorse precisely the kind of admonition addressed to her...
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Jane Austen's Emma: A Sourcebook

Paula Byrne - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 161 pages
...take so active a part in bringing two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick...and ashamed, and resolved to do such things no more. - I have been but half a friend to her; and if she were not to feel this disappointment so very much,...
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Jane Austen: 8 Books in 1

Jane Austen - Fiction - 2005 - 584 pages
...so active a part in bringing any two people together. It was adventuring too far, assuming too much, making light of what ought to be serious, a trick...concerned and ashamed, and resolved to do such things "Here have I," said she, "actually talked poor Harriet into being very much attached to this man. She...
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Falling Upwards: Essays in Defense of the Imagination

Lee Siegel - Art - 2009 - 361 pages
...one uneventful-seeming statement to the next; we feel propelled by a coming displacement of meaning ("She was quite concerned and ashamed, and resolved to do such things no more"). Austen's whole style is an evanescence laid solidly and matter-of-factly on the page like plates on...
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