Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA

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Harper Collins, Sep 30, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 416 pages
5 Reviews

In 1962, Maurice Wilkins, Francis Crick, and James Watson received the Nobel Prize, but it was Rosalind Franklin's data and photographs of DNA that led to their discovery.

Brenda Maddox tells a powerful story of a remarkably single-minded, forthright, and tempestuous young woman who, at the age of fifteen, decided she was going to be a scientist, but who was airbrushed out of the greatest scientific discovery of the twentieth century.

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ROSALIND FRANKLIN: The Dark Lady of DNA

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

This engagingly direct biography of Franklin encapsulates her vital contributions to science and in particular the deciphering of DNA while providing a durable portrait of a forceful personality ... Read full review

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User Review  - ashleypolikoff - LibraryThing

what a painful read. i think i liked her as the woman of mystery more. maddox's biography was a defensive stance against watson and crick's description of her in their books, The Double Helix and What ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Brenda Maddox is an award-winning biographer whose work has been translated into ten languages. Nora: A Biography of Nora Joyce, won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Biography, the Silver PEN Award, and the French Prix du Mailleur Livre Etranger. Her life of D. H. Lawrence won the Whitbread Biography Award in 1974, and Yeats's Ghosts, on the married life of W. B. Yeats, was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize in 1998. She has been Home Affairs Editor for the Economist, has served as chairman of the Association of British Science Writers and is a member of the Royal Society's Science and Society Committee. She lives in London and Mid-Wales.

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