The Peasant State: An Account of Bulgaria in 1894

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J. Murray, 1894 - Bulgaria - 332 pages
 

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Page 10 - When a strong man armed keepeth his palace, his goods are in peace: but when a stronger than he shall come upon him, and overcome him, he taketh from him all his armour wherein he trusted, and divideth his spoils.
Page 267 - The Prince of Bulgaria shall be freely elected by the population and confirmed by the Sublime Porte, with the consent of the Powers. No member of any of the reigning Houses of the Great European Powers can be elected Prince of Bulgaria. In case of a vacancy in the Princely dignity, the election of the new Prince shall take place under the same conditions and with the same forms.
Page 185 - ... no wants which they could not satisfy for themselves. The Bulgarian peasant needs extremely little, and that little he provides from the produce of his own land. The average cost of a peasant's daily sustenance does not exceed twopence. Their food, during the greater part of the year, consists solely of bread and garlic. Their only beverage is water ; not that they have any objection to beer or spirits, but because they object to paying for them. Sheepskins, provided in most cases from their...
Page 185 - ... little, and that little he provides from the produce of his own land. The average cost of a peasant's daily sustenance does not exceed twopence. Their food, during the greater part of the year, consists of bread and garlic. Their only beverage is water ; not that they have any objection to beer and spirits, but because they object to paying for them. Sheepskins, provided in most cases from their own flocks, form the universal dress of the peasantry. The clothes, both of the men and the women,...
Page 185 - Commonly they only possess one suit, and they sleep at night in the same clothes as those which they wear during the day. Their beds are mattresses laid on the mud floors of the rooms where they have their meals. On these mattresses the whole family lie huddled together. Even in the towns separate bedrooms are almost unknown. The servants sleep on rugs in the kitchen, and their masters and mistresses are lodged in a way any English artisan, earning good wages, would regard as intolerable...
Page 122 - Sobranye are guaranteed absolute freedom of speech, and are not liable to arrest or trial during the session of parliament without the previous consent of the chamber." . . . " The parliament thus constituted possesses absolute authority to pass laws, to impose taxes, to provide the funds required for the administration of the state, either by loans or by taxation, and to discuss and modify the budget.
Page 45 - In the course of my life it has been my lot to come across Mr. Palgrave several times. I met him when he was a Jesuit Father, and was at a monastery...
Page 145 - Except in the large towns very little interest is taken in politics. To the great mass of the electorate it is a matter of utter indifference who their representatives might be. The difficulty is to get the electors to vote at all; and in the majority of instances the representatives [in parliament] are virtually nominated by the government of the...
Page 306 - Boys over eight work in their father's shops or in the fields. Grocers are busy in the fair season and are better off than the others, most of whom are in debt. Traders work from seven to twelve in the morning and from two to eight in the evening. Between October and August...
Page 115 - Bulgaria could at once mobilize an army of one hundred thousand men, well provided with arms, ammunition, and means of transport, and ready to take the field at very brief notice.

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