Korea and Her Neighbors: A Narrative of Travel, with an Account of the Recent Vicissitudes and Present Position of the Country

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Revell, 1897 - Korea - 488 pages
 

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Contents

I
11
II
23
III
35
IV
49
V
59
VI
65
VII
71
VIII
82
XXI
239
XXII
245
XXIII
253
XXIV
255
XXV
257
XXVI
266
XXVII
275
XXVIII
294

IX
98
X
114
XI
121
XII
133
XIII
150
XIV
177
XV
185
XVI
192
XVII
199
XVIII
206
XIX
211
XX
223
XXIX
297
XXX
304
XXXI
310
XXXII
321
XXXIII
327
XXXIV
341
XXXV
353
XXXVI
363
XXXVII
383
XXXIX
409
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Page 405 - How grand and glorious is the Empire of China, the middle kingdom! She is the largest and richest in the world. The grandest men in the world have all come from the middle empire.
Page 431 - Corea, it may be necessary to have Japanese guards stationed at some places for the protection of the Japanese telegraph line between Fusan and Seoul, and that these guards now consisting of three...
Page 22 - This feeblest of independent kingdoms, rudely shaken out of her sleep of centuries, half frightened and wholly dazed, finds herself confronted with an array of powerful, ambitious, aggressive, and not always overscrupulous powers, bent, it may be, on overreaching her and each other, forcing her into new paths, ringing with rude hands the knell of timehonored custom, clamoring for concessions, and bewildering her with reforms, suggestions, and panaceas, of which she sees neither the meaning nor the...
Page 431 - ... some places for the protection of the Japanese telegraph line between Fusan and Seoul, and that these guards now consisting of three companies of soldiers, should be withdrawn as soon as possible and replaced by gendarmes, who will be distributed as follows: fifty men at Taiku, fifty men at Ka-heung and ten men each at ten intermediate posts between Fusan and Seoul. This distribution may be liable to some changes, but the total number of the gendarme force shall never exceed two hundred men,...
Page 432 - These troops will be quartered near the settlements, and shall be withdrawn as soon as no apprehension of such attacks could be entertained. For the protection of the Russian Legation and Consulates the Russian Government may also keep guards not exceeding the number of Japanese troops at these places, and which will be withdrawn as soon as tranquillity in the interior is completely restored.
Page 324 - But to all the rest, officials or soldiers, citizens or coolies, a general amnesty, free and full, is granted, irrespective of the degree of their offences. Reform your hearts ; ease your minds ; go about your business, public or private, as in times past. As to the cutting of the Top-Knots — what can We say ? Is it such an urgent matter ? The traitors, by using force and coercion, brought about the affair. That this measure was taken against Our will is, no doubt, well known to all. Nor is it...
Page 158 - I must, however, say that each village that I passed possessed from seven to twelve fishing junks, which were kept at sea. They are unseaworthy boats, and it is not surprising that they hug the shore. I believe that the fishing industry, with every other, is paralysed by the complete insecurity of the earnings of labour and by the exactions of officials, and that the Korean fisherman does not care to earn money of which he will surely be deprived on any or no pretence, and that, along with the members...
Page 359 - They haunt every umbrageous tree, shady ravine, crystal spring, and mountain crest. On green hill-slopes, in peaceful agricultural valleys, in grassy dells, on wooded uplands, by lake and stream, by road and river, in north, south, east, and west, they abound, making malignant sport out of human destinies. They are on every roof, ceiling, fireplace, kang, and beam. They fill the chimney, the shed, the living-room, the kitchen — they are on every shelf and jar.
Page 431 - Majesty from his own free will, and most of them held ministerial or other high offices during the last two years, and are known to be liberal and moderate men. The two Representatives will always aim at recommending to His Majesty to appoint liberal and moderate men as Ministers and to show clemency to his subjects.
Page 255 - Department, who, some months later, along with forty-five others, were placed on their trial before the Japanese Court of First Instance at Hiroshima, and were acquitted on the technical ground that there was "no sufficient evidence to prove that any of the accused actually committed the crime originally meditated by them...

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