p. [301]-328; "Dissertation on the ancient English Morris dance, by Francis Douce": v. 1, p. 329-365; Biographical notice of Joseph Ritson [with portrait]: v. 2, p. [i]-xxii; Tunes to the Robin Hood ballads, ed. by Dr. Rimbault

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J. R. Smith, 1850 - Ballads, English
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Page 6 - They say, he is already in the forest of Arden, and a many merry men with him ; and there they live like the old Robin Hood of England. They say, many young gentlemen flock to him every day ; and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
Page ii - Horace Walpole in his Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of King Richard III.
Page xx - Cowley : so, on the contrary, an ordinary song or ballad, that is the delight of the common people, cannot fail to please all such readers as are not unqualified for the entertainment by their affectation or ignorance ; and the reason is plain, because the same paintings of nature which recommend it to the most ordinary reader, will appear beautiful to the most refined.
Page 94 - An outlaw, in those times, being deprived of protection, owed no allegiance : " his hand ' was' against every man, and every man's hand against him.
Page 286 - but I would have you know that our liege lord has bid me bear you his seal, and pray you to come to Nottingham." At this message Robin bent his knee. " I love no man in all the world so well as I do my King...
Page 51 - The death of Robert, earle of Huntington, otherwise called Robin Hood of merrie Sherwodde : with the lamentable tragedie of chaste Matilda, his faire maid Marian, poysoned at Dunmowe, by king John. Acted, ike.
Page 85 - Minstrels subsisted, they seem never to have designed their rhymes for literary publication, and probably never committed them to writing themselves : what copies are preserved of them were doubtless taken down from their mouths. But as the old Minstrels gradually wore out, a new race of ballad-writers succeeded, an inferior sort of minor poets, who wrote narrative songs merely for the press.
Page 353 - I'll make ye set a new piece o' your nose there ; Take't up I say, and dance without more bidding, And dance as you were wont ; you have been excellent, And...
Page 119 - ... a regularity and order far more perfect than had heretofore been purchased by submission to absolute power, and to draw forth liberty from confinement in single cities to a fitness for being spread over territories which, experience does not forbid us to hope, may be as vast as have ever been grasped by the iron gripe of a despotic conqueror.
Page 61 - I would preach there in the morning, because it was holiday, and methought it was an holiday's work. The church stood in my way, and I took my horse and my company, and went thither. I thought I should have found a great company in the church, and when I came there, the church door was fast locked. I tarried there half an hour and more; at last the...

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