Nature Versus Natural Selection: An Essay on Organic Evolution

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London, 1895 - Evolution - 591 pages
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Page 46 - Things base and vile, holding no quantity, Love can transpose to form and dignity. Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind ; And therefore is wing'd Cupid painted blind...
Page 504 - I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion, Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them...
Page 322 - So careful of the type' ? but no. From scarped cliff and quarried stone She cries, 'A thousand types are gone: I care for nothing, all shall go.
Page 479 - We could never have loved the earth so well if we had had no childhood in it, - if it were not the earth where the same flowers come up again every spring that we used to gather with our tiny fingers as we sat lisping to ourselves on the grass; the same hips and haws on the autumn's hedgerows; the same redbreasts that we used to call "God's birds," because they did no harm to the precious crops.
Page 543 - God ! that one might read the book of fate, And see the revolution of the times Make mountains level, and the continent, Weary of solid firmness, melt itself Into the sea...
Page 140 - Say,' there be : Yet nature is made better by no mean, But nature makes that mean: so, o'er that art Which, you say, adds to nature, is an art That nature makes.
Page 459 - Happy is he who lives to understand Not human nature only, but explores All natures, to the end that he may find The law that governs each : and where begins The union, the partition where, that makes Kind and degree among all visible beings ; The constitutions, powers, and faculties...
Page 51 - Thy crowned are as the locusts, and thy captains as the great grasshoppers, which camp in the hedges in the cold day, but when the sun ariseth they flee away, and their place is not known where they are.
Page 74 - Seedlings, also, are destroyed in vast numbers by various enemies ; for instance, on a piece of ground three feet long and two wide, dug and cleared, and where there could be no choking from other plants, I marked all the seedlings of our native weeds as they came up, and out of the 357 no less than 295 were destroyed, chiefly by slugs and insects.
Page 140 - But nature makes that mean: so, o'er that art, Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry A gentler...

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