Tourists at the Taj: Performance and Meaning at a Symbolic Site

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1998 - History - 223 pages
0 Reviews
The Taj Mahal has long been a subject for photography and poetry, but this book presents the first sociological analysis of the Taj as a cultural phenomenon. Tim Edensor examines the conflicting narratives which surround the site: postcolonial views of the monument as a symbol of love, of India and of splendid exuberance; and those which challenge this ethnocentricity, for whom the Taj is the symbolic center of Islamic power or a site of Moghul appropriation. He discusses many of the tourist practices around the Taj and considers the notion of tourism in a wider context. Clearly written and fascinatingly illustrated, this book describes tourism as "performance" and the tourist site as a "stage" on which tourists are directed and rehearsed, improvising cultural conventions in the complex production of leisure space.--Publisher description.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Constructing tourist space
10
The regulation of tourist space
41
Narratives of the Taj Mahal
69
Walking gazing photographing and remembering at the Taj
105
Enclavic and heterogenous tourist spaces in Agra
149
Tourist plans for Agra and the Taj
181
Conclusion
200
Bibliography
205
Index
215
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page vi - Henceforth, let the inhabitants of the world be divided into two classes — them as has seen the Taj Mahal ; and them as hasn't.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

Tim Edensor is a Lecturer in Cultural Studies, at the Staffordshire University.

Bibliographic information